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  1. There are five Thursdays in this month. Each Thursday I aim to present one of the YouTube videos from the PCRI. Hormone therapy, also called androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) keeps most of us alive by robbing the body (and the prostate cancer) of androgens. The main androgen is testosterone. When our bodies are without testosterone, some men experience hot flashes (also called hot flushes). The experience varies from man to man. Some men have no hot flashes. Others have their life very affected. Personally, my hot flashes were mild at first, and gradually faded to undetectable over a few years. In this video, PCRI’s Executive Director, Mark Scholz, MD, discusses various methods for managing hot flashes that occur in men who are undergoing hormone therapy for prostate cancer: And a reminder that we have a few videos of our own on the JimJimJimJim channel: https://www.youtube.com/jimjimjimjim/videos The Prostate Cancer Research Institute (PCRI) is an important source of information for about prostate cancer for patients, families, and the medical community. As part of their mission to empower men and their caregivers they make YouTube videos.
  2. This video today is about weight training for men on hormone therapy for prostate cancer. Hormone therapy is also called 'Androgen Deprivation Therapy' (ADT) because it robs a man of androgens. The main androgen is testosterone. Androgens fuel prostate cancer. And a reminder that we have a few videos of our own on the JimJimJimJim channel: https://www.youtube.com/jimjimjimjim/videos The Prostate Cancer Research Institute (PCRI) is an important source of information for about prostate cancer for patients, families, and the medical community. As part of their mission to empower men and their caregivers they make YouTube videos.
  3. pauldhodson

    Testosterone therapy

    Hi Guys, I have recently had a Zolodex implant. My current Oncologist is very conservative and each time I discuss something controversial, such as Testosterone therapy, Bi-polar Androgen Therapy, weekly low-dose chemo (as opposed to high dose three-weekly infusions) she [is not enthusiastic [moderator]]. I live in Perth, does anyone know of an [ ] Oncologist in Perth, who [may be more enthusiastic[mod]] about new treatment options? Cheers Paul
  4. This video is about a treatment for men who already have prostate cancer. It is about adding an occasional testosterone boost to regular drug therapy to treat prostate cancer. Dr Sam Denmeade reports on encouraging trials of this approach. It is 56 minutes long and has Closed Captions (Cc) for the hard of hearing. Thanks to Rick Davis of the Answer Cancer Foundation for allowing us to post this video. Access the whole presentation, including introductions, questions and answers, at: https://www.ancan.org/bat-presentation The questions and answers begin at about 1hour 4minutes.
  5. "Bipolar Androgen Therapy" (BAT) involves alternately flooding and starving the body of the male hormone testosterone. Last year the forum had a post about a small study of 16 men which tested Bipolar Androgen Therapy: click here to read that previous post. The same researchers have now reported on a larger study with 47 Participants; click here to read about this study. Dr Matt Hobbs, deputy director of research at the charity Prostate Cancer UK, warned: "this is early stage research and further studies are needed in order to understand exactly how intriguing developments like this work and to test the findings more robustly in large clinical trials."
  6. Jim Marshall (not a doctor) said ... New agreement At the recent Prostate Cancer Research Institute (PCRI) conference I was fortunate to meet with Jan Manarite, Executive Vice President of Prostate Cancer International. The "New" Prostate Cancer Infolink is their corporate website. In the past we have republished individual articles from their site, with permission. Jan has been kind enough to now give us blanket permission to republish any article, with proper attribution. We are grateful to Jan and to Prostate Cancer International for this kindness. This article Men who were on hormone therapy (ADT) for 6 years took a long time to recover testosterone, if they did at all. ... end Jim From The "New" Prostate Cancer Infolink: After long-term ADT … recovery normal of hormonal function? Posted on September 22, 2016 by Sitemaster 2 Votes A group of Spanish clinical researchers have reported recent data from a small study designed to address an unanswered question about the recovery of (relatively) normal hormonal function after completion of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Planas et al., writing in the Scandanavian Journal of Urology, report data from a cohort of 40 patients who: • Were all treated with long-term ADT for locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer • Had an average (mean) age of 71.5 years • Were treated with ADT for an average duration of 74.6 months (i.e., about 6 years) and then • Stopped their ADT therapy without any consequent rise in their PSA level The men were then followed for an average of another 36.5 months (about 3 years), and their serum testosterone (T) and serum luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were determined at 6-monthly intervals after cessation of the ADT. Here is what the research team reported: • At 18 months of follow-up, ◦ All patients had recovered normal levels of LH. ◦ 38 percent of patients still had castrate levels of serum T (< 50 ng/dl). • Based on a multivariate analysis ◦ Only time on ADT was correlated with recovery of serum T levels > 50 ng/ml (p = 0.031) ◦ Neither age nor clinical stage at start of ADT showed statistical correlation to recovery of serum T levels > 50 ng/ml • Average time for recovery of a serum T level of > 50 ng/ml was ◦ 14.5 months in men treated with ADT for < 60 months ◦ 29.3 months in men treated with ADT for > 60 months The authors conclude that: Age did not correlate with testosterone recovery in a group of elderly prostate cancer patients in whom ADT was stopped. Testosterone recovery after ADT cessation was significantly correlated with time under ADT treatment. So what this tells us is that a significant percentage of men on long-term ADT are probably never going to regain anything approaching normal serum T levels on their own after stopping ADT. We are aware of a small number of men who, after being on long-term ADT for several years, and stopping, then took testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) to regain normal serum T levels. That strategy clearly comes with a significant level of risk in men who were originally being treated with ADT for advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Might that be an acceptable risk for some patients? Well, … probably only an individual patient could answer that question — and only with regard to himself. Original article on the "New" Prostate Cancer Infolink site https://prostatecancerinfolink.net/2016/09/22/after-long-term-adt-recovery-normal-of-hormonal-function/
  7. Agenda Friday 26 August 2016 Please note This is a permanent change. We do not use 4444# any more. The phone numbers are unchanged. Urologist Ano Navaratnam (Urology Fellow Princess Alexandra and Greenslopes Hospital) and Medical Oncologist Ken Ho (Professor of Medicine, University of Queensland and Chair Centres for Health Research, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane) are conducting a clinical trial giving testosterone to men on hormone therapy (ADT). We are thrilled that they are both joining our phone-in meeting this Friday 26 August 2016 to tell us the details and answer our questions on the study. Join us this Friday morning! Disclaimer This Community does not give medical advice. No members are authorised to give medical advice. Ask your doctor if you hear anything here that you think may be related to your treatment. Time 9:30am - 11:00am Eastern Standard Time (Queensland) The formal phone-in meeting ends after 90 minutes. The lines are kept open for up to an hour after that for members to informally chat. Daylight savings times Brisbane 9:30am Sydney, Melbourne, Hobart: 10:30am Adelaide, 10:00am Perth 7:30am Winter times Brisbane 9:30am Sydney, Melbourne, Hobart 9:30am Adelaide 9:00am Perth 7:30am Daylight saving ends first Sunday in April Daylight saving starts first Sunday in October Dial in You must dial in - we do NOT dial you. Landline - Anywhere in Australia - 25 cents Phone numbers only available in members email. Mobile phone warning The costs of mobile calls are nothing to do with the Advanced Prostate Cancer Support Group or with PCFA. They are between you and your phone provider (Optus, Telstra, Virgin, Vodafone, etc). If you dial one of the capital city numbers given above from a mobile phone, the cost to you will be the cost on your mobile phone plan. If your plan gives you free, or low cost local calls, and you are in one of these cities, it should be free, or a local call. If your plan gives you free, or local cost national calls that should work too. Be sure - call your provider, give the number you might be calling, and check the cost for you to call that number. Speaking time We want many voices to be heard. If you are a member listed to speak below, the chair will probably expect you to take no more than about 5 minutes on presentation so there is plenty of time for others to respond. Special Guest Speakers are invited to speak for 10-15 minutes, then field questions. Guidelines No noise House - radio, TV, computer, pets, other phones, conversation Yourself - mute button, or mouthpiece away from mouth Phone - call waiting off (#43#), Mute button or hang up to leave the room. No mute button? ##4 to mute, ##5 to unmute. Cordless phone - don't carry, put on folded handkerchief to limit reverberation Other calls - Please do NOT use call waiting or another line on the same phone to take another call - members around Australia are left listening to your 'hold' music until you return. Speaker phone Please do NOT use a speaker phone, unless you are very good at keeping it Mute, and at lifting and using the hand piece when you wish to join in the conversation. Mobile phone You will need enough charge for the length of the call, or take the call with your charger plugged in. Speaking Speak clearly into mouthpiece in ordinary voice. Say who you are when signing in, and each time you speak. Listen for the gavel. The Chair may need to interrupt. It's a meeting of 20 people, not a simple phone conversation. If you are not one of the two people in the particular conversation at the time, keep your mute button down and let others contribute. Help the secretary by later emailing details for the minutes. Restarting You may hang up and sign in again as many times as necessary. Sometimes we may have to restart the meeting - dial in again. With everyone calling at once you may need to try more than once. Apologies From. Late starters Maybe you haven't had access to the agenda or you have late breaking news you would like to share. Tell the chairman here at the beginning of the meeting that you would like to speak, and he will fit you in - probably later, perhaps right now if that suits. Special expert guest speakers Urologist Ano Navaratnam (Urology Fellow Princess Alexandra and Greenslopes Hospital) and Medical Oncologist Ken Ho (Professor of Medicine, University of Queensland and Chair Centres for Health Research, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane) are conducting a clinical trial giving testosterone to men on hormone therapy (ADT). We are thrilled that they are both joining our phone-in meeting this Friday 26 August 2016 to tell us the details and answer our questions on the study. Other new stories or updates Any man who wishes to update us on his progress is welcome to contribute here. Formal end The Chair will declare the formal part of the teleconference closed at his discretion, perhaps around 11am. The teleconference lines will be kept open until at least 11:30 for anyone who wishes to continue discussions, update his health, or just chat. Informal chat Any topic you like - topics we didn't reach, something discussed earlier you wish to comment on, an update on your health, how your new boat is going, moaning about the weather, anything that you wish to say. Future phone-in support group meetings Fourth Friday of each month, except: January (one week late for Australia Day), March (one week early for Easter), and December (one week early for Christmas) Phone-in support group meeting dates 2016 June 24 July 22 (not the last Friday) August 26 September 23 (not the last Friday) October 28 November 25 December 16 (not the fourth Friday) Changes or questions If you wish to update us about any changes in your health or treatment, or have a question you would like answered or discussed, or you would like to talk about joining a teleconference group, let us know. Then we can put it high on the agenda so it doesn't get lost - just reply to this email, or use Contact Jim on JimJimJimJim.com. This message has been send to you because you are a member of an Advanced Prostate Cancer Support Group. Visit JimJimJimJim.com and click on Contact Jim if this is a problem.
  8. Paul Edwards

    "Bipolar Androgen Therapy"

    In a surprising paradox, the male hormone testosterone, generally thought to be a feeder of prostate cancer, has been found to suppress some advanced prostate cancers and also may reverse resistance to testosterone-blocking drugs used to treat prostate cancer. A small study of 16 patients at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center was reported in the Jan. 7 issue of Science Translational Medicine. Larger studies are necessary before the treatment can be used outside clinical trials. Here is a link to a report in the HealthDay newsletter about the study: http://consumer.healthday.com/cancer-information-5/prostate-cancer-news-106/strategy-might-thwart-resistance-to-a-common-prostate-cancer-treatment-695278.html
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