Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'chemotherapy'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • COMMUNITY
    • Announcements, meetings and other resources
  • ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER FORUMS
    • Primary hormone therapy
    • Secondary hormone therapy
    • Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer
    • Metastatic
    • Very high risk
    • New agents
    • Every little bit helps
    • Radiation, diagnostic imaging, bones and other prostate cancer topics
    • Articles on other sites
  • MEMBER'S STORIES AND NEEDS
    • My story
    • Any suggestions?
    • The lounge

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

  1. Safety at home for patients on chemotherapy Chemotherapy (pronounced kee-mo-ther- a-pee) is a cancer treatment that uses drugs or medicines to kill cancer cells. It is sometimes just called ‘chemo’. Patients can have chemotherapy in different ways. Intravenous (IV) chemotherapy is given into the patient’s vein, and goes straight into their blood. Oral chemotherapy is given by mouth, as tablets, capsules or liquids that
  2. Last Friday 10 March 2017 the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) reached its initial decisions on drugs to go onto the PBS at reduced prices. This included whether to put Xtandi (Enzalutamide) before chemo on the PBS. The company will be told of the result next Friday 17 March 2017. If necessary, negotiations between the PBAC and the company continue for 4 weeks. The final results will be published on the PBAC website 21 April 2017. (If the company is not happy with the result, they have until July 2017 to appeal.)
  3. This video is about a treatment for men who already have prostate cancer. It is about adding an occasional testosterone boost to regular drug therapy to treat prostate cancer. Dr Sam Denmeade reports on encouraging trials of this approach. It is 56 minutes long and has Closed Captions (Cc) for the hard of hearing. Thanks to Rick Davis of the Answer Cancer Foundation for allowing us to post this video. Access the whole presentation, including introductions, questions and answers, at: https://www.ancan.org/bat-presentation The questions and answers begin at about 1hour 4minutes
  4. This is very encouraging for me. I was diagnosed in February 2015 at the age of 68 with no PCa related symptoms but with elevated PSA of 11.7ng/ml. Needle biopsy confirmed PCa of GL 9. I underwent open RP in March 2015. Post surgery staging : T2c No Mx, GL 4+5=9 and positive surgical margin. 3 weeks after surgery PSA fell undetectable, yet I underwent IMRT and ADT with 50mg Bicalutamide added alongside for a period of 2 years ( continuous protocol ) completing in end April 2017. Throughout this treatment period up to now my PSA checked every 3 months has remained at 0.008ng/ml. My treatme
  5. Treatment of metastatic prostate cancer has changed recently. In the past doctors would use hormone therapy (ADT) at first, then wait until the disease was very progressed before giving chemotherapy with Taxotere (Docetaxel). The reason for the change? Professor Christopher Sweeney reported on a trial he led (CHAARTED). In CHAARTED, the researchers (an international team of medical oncologists) showed that starting BOTH chemotherapy and ADT at the beginning of treatment gave men a longer life. Members of your Executive Committee were invited to be the audience for an video inter
  6. The opportunity There is a chance to have your voice heard on whether the drug Xtandi (enzalutamide) should be available on the PBS BEFORE chemotherapy. Timing Submissions are due Wednesday 8 February 2017, and no late submissions will be accepted. Enzalutamide on the PBS An important drug for men with advanced prostate cancer is Xtandi, also called enzalutamide. The first evidence that enzalutamide worked looked at using enzalutamide AFTER the chemotherapy drug docetaxel. A committee of experts looked at this evidence. They r
  7. The Reluctant Brothers in their American teleconference recently discussed the work of Dr Valter Longo regarding fasting and chemotherapy. This discussion was prompted by papers published in July 2016 in the journals Cancer Cell and BMC Cancer by Dr Longo's team. In 2014 we posted about Dr Longo's work : Since 2008 Dr. Valter Longo, a professor of gerontology and biological science at the University of Southern California has been investigating whether fasting reduces some of the side effects of chemotherapy. “Fasting makes things worse for the cancer, when
  8. The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) has just had its Annual Conference in Copenhagen. Click here and here for 2 reports from Practice Update about some of the things discussed at ESMO 2016 and the implications for patients.
  9. Treatment of metastatic prostate cancer has changed recently. In the past doctors used to use hormone therapy (ADT) at first, then wait until the disease was very progressed before giving chemotherapy with Taxotere (Docetaxel). The reason for the change? Professor Christopher Sweeney reported on a trial he led (CHAARTED). In CHAARTED, the researchers (an international team of medical oncologists) showed that starting BOTH chemotherapy and ADT at the beginning of treatment gave men a longer life. Yesterday (Sunday, 4 Sep 2016), members of your Executive Committee w
  10. "TAPS stands for “taxane acute pain syndrome”. It is a recognized side effect of treatment with taxanes like docetaxel. It is usually characterized by muscular pain (myalgia) and joint pain (arthralgia) that starts about 24 to 48 hours after taxane treatment and then lasts for up to about 7 days. However, relatively little is known about its incidence and predisposing factors in men with prostate cancer who are being treated with taxane-based chemotherapy.....................
  11. Some men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer have metastases at the time of their diagnosis. Until recently the primary treatment for these men was Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT). Since the CHAARTED and STAMPEDE trials, ADT + Chemotherapy (Docetaxel) has become the standard of care for these men. What about ADT + Chemotherapy + Radiotherapy for these men? Maybe. Removal of the primary cancer has been used effectively in other cancers, either using radiation or surgery to increase cancer-specific survival time. "Whether radiotherapy or su
  12. Jim Marshall (not a doctor) said ... If you have advanced prostate cancer then chemotherapy with a drug like Taxotere (docetaxel) may be part of your treatment. As your body deals with chemo, there is a risk of serious infection. Back in 2013 we published concise advice from a USA government site about avoiding or dealing with chemotherapy infections. Click on this sentence to read that advice on our site, which also has links to the Prevent Cancer Infections site. ... end Jim
  13. Jim was away in Sydney with a swag of other members representing our group at a meeting with Janssen, the suppliers of the drug Zytiga. As a result of this, Jim asked me to chair our phone in conference in his absence. We had no guest speaker at our gathering which made life a little easier for me as our talks would be based on a round table discussion among members. I had the feeling it might be a bit dull without a guest and members be reluctant to come forward and speak on issues. With this in mind I prepared some topics prior to the meeting just in case. I needn't have worried as right fro
  14. Peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect of chemotherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Patients who suffer from this condition have damage to their peripheral nerves and experience weakness, numbness and pain usually in their hands or feet and occasionally in other areas of the body. Researchers at the Moffatt Cancer Center at Tampa, Florida have found that genetic alterations in the VAC14 gene are associated with an increased risk of docetaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy in prostate cancer patients. This discovery may help scientists to understand what causes
  15. Some men may experience a PSA flare when starting docetaxel chemotherapy. The occurrence of PSA flare had no effect on treatment duration or outcome. Joel Nowak at Malecare reports on recent research. Click on this link to read his report. PSA flare is where there is a sharp initial increase in PSA following the commencement of treatment.
  16. Cabazitaxel is a chemotherapy treatment which is used when patients become resistant to chemotherapy treatment with Docetaxel. Cabazitaxel improves overall survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) previously treated with Docetaxel. Androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) in circulating tumuor cells (CTCs) from mCRPC patients was recently demonstrated to be associated with resistance to Abiraterone and Enzalutamide. A group of Dutch and Belgian researchers investigated whether this was also true for Cabazitaxel. They found that Cabazitax
  17. Click on this link for a recent article by US oncologist, Mark Scholz, about chemotherapy.
  18. "One almost universal side effect from chemotherapy is the difficulty many of us face in getting enough nutrition. Nutrition comes from eating food yet many of us just don’t feel hungry so eating is difficult. We lose our appetite, food tastes terrible and we battle nausea." Click on this link to read some suggestions from the Malecare Blog about how to maintain adequate nutrition when on chemotherapy.
  19. Chemotherapy can cause peripheral neuropathy (damage to your peripheral nerves). Peripheral neuropathy often causes weakness, numbness and pain, usually in your hands and feet. A study of female cancer survivors found that almost half experience chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy symptoms years after completing their cancer treatment. These symptoms were associated with impacts including reduced mobility and significantly increased risk of falls. The results were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Cancer Survivorship Symposium held in San Francisco
  20. With increasing options to treat advanced prostate cancer, there is no clear agreement on the order in which these treatments should be given. I attach a chart prepared (following the STAMPEDE clinical trial which recommended early ADT and chemotherapy for certain patients) by an American oncologist setting out his view of what is currently best clinical practice in America. In Australia our options are more restricted: Abiraterone and Enzalutamide are only available on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme after chemotherapy and Provenge is not available on the Pharmaceutical Benefi
  21. I got asked by someone about handling the side effects from chemo. Here are some suggestions. Click on this link for some suggestions from the Cancer Council. Click on this link for a research study which looked at the evidence for what works and what doesn’t. Do any members have other suggestions of what worked for them?
  22. Novel combination therapy shows promise in mouse models of advanced prostate cancer Published in News Medicine on April 30, 2015 at 7:00 AM · Chemotherapy can be very effective against small prostate tumors. Larger prostate tumors, however, accumulate cells that suppress the body's immune response, allowing the cancer to grow despite treatment. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine now find that blocking or removing these immune-suppressing cells allows a special type of chemotherapy — and the immune cells it activates — to destroy prostate tumors
  23. Dr Charles Myers Jnr (nickname Snuffy Myers) is one of the best known medical oncologists specialising solely on prostate cancer in the USA. He produces a free video on prostate cancer treatment each week, and a paid monthly newsletter service. He also writes books. In a recent video (18 September 2014) Dr Myers talked about Taxotere (brand name Docetaxel) and the CHAARTED trial. Whilst the video deals mainly with early Taxotere use in newly diagnosed patients, there are also some interesting comments about Taxotere use in advanced patients. See this Dr Myers Video at: http:
  24. Paul Edwards (not a doctor) says: This looks interesting. Perhaps Chuck Maack may know more about this? Has anyone discussed it with their oncologist? Since 2008 Dr. Valter Longo, a professor of gerontology and biological science at the University of Southern California has been investigating whether fasting reduces some of the side effects of chemotherapy. “Fasting makes things worse for the cancer, when assisted by chemotherapy. It’s the combination of the two treatments which produces the effect. Most people can last for up to 40 days with just water. Normal cells know h
  25. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has just released a safety warning about the intravenous chemotherapy drug, docetaxel. Docetaxel contains alcohol, which may cause patients to experience intoxication or feel drunk during and after treatment. The FDA suggested that patients should: Avoid driving, operating machinery or doing other activities that are dangerous or require skill one to two hours after you receive treatment with docetaxel. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you are currently taking, as the alcohol in docetaxel may affect other medicines you are usi
×
×
  • Create New...