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Found 15 results

  1. Jim Marshall (not a doctor) said ... Cardiovascular If you know the term 'cardiovascular', you probably know two major things - heart attack and stroke. A fuller list includes: Abnormal heart rhythms, or arrhythmias Aorta disease and Marfan syndrome Congenital heart disease Coronary artery disease (narrowing of the arteries) Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism Heart attack Heart failure Heart muscle disease (cardiomyopathy) Heart valve disease Pericardial disease Peripheral vascular disease Rheumatic
  2. There are five Thursdays in this month. Each Thursday I aim to present one of the YouTube videos from the PCRI. Hormone therapy, also called androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) keeps most of us alive by robbing the body (and the prostate cancer) of androgens. The main androgen is testosterone. When our bodies are without testosterone, some men experience hot flashes (also called hot flushes). The experience varies from man to man. Some men have no hot flashes. Others have their life very affected. Personally, my hot flashes were mild at first, and gradua
  3. This video today is about weight training for men on hormone therapy for prostate cancer. Hormone therapy is also called 'Androgen Deprivation Therapy' (ADT) because it robs a man of androgens. The main androgen is testosterone. Androgens fuel prostate cancer. And a reminder that we have a few videos of our own on the JimJimJimJim channel: https://www.youtube.com/jimjimjimjim/videos The Prostate Cancer Research Institute (PCRI) is an important source of information for about prostate cancer for patients, families, and the medical community. A
  4. " In what seems to be a first, study researchers are saying that they might have uncovered a link between ADT and Alzheimer’s. Their study is small and preliminary and it does not prove a cause-and-effect relationship, but merely shows an association between ADT and Alzheimer’s disease." Click here to read more.
  5. One of the drugs used in androgen deprivation therapy is Firmagon (degarelix). Firmagon requires a monthly injection. There can be severe pain at the site of the injection (caused by bruising and rashes which can last for 3-4 days each month). This post has been updated with additional suggestions about how to miminise the pain from a Firmagon injection.
  6. Paul Edwards

    Coming out of the closet

    Dr Richard Wassersug writes the Life on ADT Blog and is a co-author of the book Androgen Deprivation Therapy:An Essential Guide for Prostate Cancer. In 2007 he wrote an article in the New York Times announcing that he was a eunuch. Click on this link to read the article
  7. Depression resulting from Androgen Deprivation Therapy is a completely under-recognized phenomenon, according to a recent article. Click on this link to read the article. Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636 and Lifeline 13 11 14 provide support for depression.
  8. Luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa) or antagonists are used for Androgen Deprivation Therapy in men with advanced prostate cancer. These include Zoladex, Lucrin, Eligard and Firmagon. Oral estrogen (eg, diethylstilboestrol [DES]) was previously used for Androgen Deprivation Therapy before the development of LHRHa drugs. Oral estrogen ceased to be used for Androgen Deprivation Therapy because of cardiovascular toxicity (damage to the heart). The cardiovascular toxicity was caused by the way that oral estrogen was metabolised in the liver. If estrogen is adminis
  9. The New Prostate Cancer Infolink reports Full data on ADT + chemotherapy from the STAMPEDE trial now published The report has links to the full text of articles in the Lancet regarding this research. "For men with metastatic prostate cancer starting [androgen deprivation] therapy for the first time, we found strong evidence to support the addition of docetaxel to androgen deprivation therapy as the new standard of care, and this combination should be offered to men who are fit to receive chemotherapy. " There is no sufficient evidence yet to recommend docetaxel plus androgen depriva
  10. Researchers asked prostate cancer patients to fill in an online questionnaire on their mood in relation to the prostate cancer treatments they had received. Their results showed that, compared to patients not on ADT, ADT does indeed negatively affect the mood of men, most notably increasing their sense of fatigue and decreasing their sense of vigor. The authors also asked partners of patients to rate the patients’ moods. The partners reported similar declines in the patient’s mood that the patients reported, but to a greater degree than the patients themselves. Often our partners know us
  11. The Life on ADT blog has a report on recent research. Click on this link to read it.
  12. A retrospective study of nearly 17,000 patients has suggested that androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) is associated with an increased risk for the future development of Alzheimer's disease in men with prostate cancer,. Click here to read a report in the New Prostate Cancer Infolink about the study. Researchers can’t prove a direct cause-and-effect link between ADT and Alzheimer’s in an observational study like this. Some other unknown variable might be influencing the results........ Given that it’s a first-time association in a retrospective analysis, this study hel
  13. A good video by the Prostate Cancer Canada Network Calgary. Psychologists from the Tom Baker Cancer Centre in Calgary Canada, Lauren M. Walker and John W. Robinson, share a talk the context of when Androgen Deprivation Therapy, or ADT, is used for treatment. They also talk about the studies and work they've done on the treatment, the side effects and ways to deal with them.
  14. In today's teleconference it was suggested that Megace might be useful to reduce hot flushes. I notice that Chuck Maack recently referred in a US forum to a warning by top Medical Oncologist Stephen Strum against men on androgen deprivation therapy using Megace for hot flushes. Strum warns: "I am not a user of Megace in this setting since it is metabolized to DHEA and then to androstenedione and then to testosterone. When the PSA is in good control and the testosterone is low, I use Depo Provera intramuscular injection 400mg ONCE and that usually eliminates hot flashes forever. Th
  15. Paul Edwards

    ADT affects the brain

    Cognitive impairment can occur in cancer patients who are treated with a variety of therapies, including radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. After chemotherapy treatment it is commonly called "chemo brain." Signs of cognitive impairment include forgetfulness, inability to concentrate, problems recalling information, trouble multi-tasking and becoming slower at processing information. The number of people who experience cognitive problems following cancer therapy is broad, with an estimated range of 15 to 70 percent. There have been several studies analyzing this side e
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