Jump to content

Latest posts

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Yesterday
  2. Nev Black (Toowoomba, Queensland) and Peter Kafka (Maui, Hawaii) help inventor John Teisberg (St Paul, Minnesota) to display the workings of Man Junk at the recent PCRI annual Prostate Cancer Patient Conference in Los Angeles. Amongst his other achievements, John started the Reluctant Brotherhood, which has morphed into Answer Cancer.
  3. Agenda Friday 22 September 2017 You must dial in - we do NOT dial you. Landline - Anywhere in Australia - 25 cents Phone numbers only in email. If this is a problem, contact Jim. Apologies From Doug Meiklejohn preparing for daughter's wedding. Late starters Maybe you haven't had access to the agenda or you have late breaking news you would like to share. Tell the chairman here at the beginning of the meeting that you would like to speak, and he will fit you in - probably later, perhaps right now if that suits. Roundtable - new stories, updates, questions Any man who wishes is welcome to contribute here. Formal end The Chair will declare the formal part of the teleconference closed at his discretion, perhaps around 11am. The teleconference lines will be kept open until at least 11:30 for anyone who wishes to continue discussions, update his health, or just chat. Informal chat Any topic you like - topics we didn't reach, something discussed earlier you wish to comment on, an update on your health, how your new boat is going, moaning about the weather, anything that you wish to say. Disclaimer This Community does not give medical advice. No members are authorised to give medical advice. Ask your doctor if you hear anything here that you think may be related to your treatment. Time 9:30am - 11:00am Eastern Standard Time (Queensland) The formal phone-in meeting ends after 90 minutes. The lines are kept open for up to an hour after that for members to informally chat. Daylight savings times Brisbane 9:30am Sydney, Melbourne, Hobart: 10:30am Adelaide, 10:00am Perth 7:30am Winter times Brisbane 9:30am Sydney, Melbourne, Hobart 9:30am Adelaide 9:00am Perth 7:30am Daylight saving ends first Sunday in April Daylight saving starts first Sunday in October Mobile phone warning The costs of mobile calls are nothing to do with the Advanced Prostate Cancer Support Group or with PCFA. They are between you and your phone provider (Optus, Telstra, Virgin, Vodafone, etc). If you dial one of the capital city numbers given above from a mobile phone, the cost to you will be the cost on your mobile phone plan. If your plan gives you free, or low cost local calls, and you are in one of these cities, it should be free, or a local call. If your plan gives you free, or local cost national calls that should work too. Be sure - call your provider, give the number you might be calling, and check the cost for you to call that number. Speaking time We want many voices to be heard. If you are a member listed to speak below, the chair will probably expect you to take no more than about 5 minutes on presentation so there is plenty of time for others to respond. Special Guest Speakers are invited to speak for 10-15 minutes, then field questions. Guidelines No noise House - radio, TV, computer, pets, other phones, conversation Yourself - mute button, or mouthpiece away from mouth Phone - call waiting off (#43#), Mute button or hang up to leave the room. No mute button? ##4 to mute, ##5 to unmute. Cordless phone - don't carry, put on folded handkerchief to limit reverberation Other calls - Please do NOT use call waiting or another line on the same phone to take another call - members around Australia are left listening to your 'hold' music until you return. Speaker phone Please do NOT use a speaker phone, unless you are very good at keeping it Mute, and at lifting and using the hand piece when you wish to join in the conversation. Mobile phone You will need enough charge for the length of the call, or take the call with your charger plugged in. Speaking Speak clearly into mouthpiece in ordinary voice. Say who you are when signing in, and each time you speak. Listen for the gavel. The Chair may need to interrupt. It's a meeting of 20 people, not a simple phone conversation. If you are not one of the two people in the particular conversation at the time, keep your mute button down and let others contribute. Help the secretary by later emailing details for the minutes. Restarting You may hang up and sign in again as many times as necessary. Sometimes we may have to restart the meeting - dial in again. With everyone calling at once you may need to try more than once. Future phone-in support group meetings Fourth Friday of each month, except: January (one week late for Australia Day), March (one week early for Easter), and December (one week early for Christmas) Phone-in support group meeting dates 2017 September 22 (not the last Friday) October 27 November 24 December 15 (one week early, not the fourth Friday) Changes or questions If you wish to update us about any changes in your health or treatment, or have a question you would like answered or discussed, or you would like to talk about joining a teleconference group, let us know. Then we can put it high on the agenda so it doesn't get lost - just reply to this email, or use Contact Jim on JimJimJimJim.com. This message has been send to you because you are a member of the Advanced Prostate Cancer Support Group. Visit JimJimJimJim.com and click on Contact Jim if this is a problem.
  4. Dr says wait before starting ADT

    Hi Mike, It's been shown repeatedly that the people with cancer who do best are the ones who take an active role in their treatment rather than just hopping on the medical conveyor, hoping to come out the other end. You're off to a good start getting some expert first hand advice from men of JIMJIMJIMJIM who have been there and done that. And there are two ways that you can really help yourself: exercise and diet. Now from what you've said, you seem to have exercise pretty well sorted. I'd be looking at what might be possible with diet. On 25th Aug, Jim arranged a phone-in with a renowned expert, Dr Mark Moyad. Really worth while and, having just joined, you probably missed it, but you can catch up here: http://forums.jimjimjimjim.com/topic/1832-mark-moyad-the-youtube-video-from-yesterday/ During Mark's presentation he says "One other thing ...I'm excited about is the possibility of other types of diet that men can use... A Ketogenic Diet helps suppress appetite and people feel good because they can eat a lot of these foods that they thought they had to stay away from and is another option, that is getting countless clinical trials right now, to not only lose weight with prostate cancer but to potentially rob the tumor of any different types of sugars that it could utilize for growth. Now, ... I think there's a lot of diet options... in 2017, the buzz word is, and will continue to be for the next year or two, will be a high-fat diet to see if you can lose weight and/or suppress tumor growth." (The emphasis is mine.) Bearing in mind that clinical trials are nearly always funded by big pharma with the hope of a drug to sell at the end, I'm amazed that so much money is being spent. There is no possibility of selling anything. No way to recoup the money. Just improved public health. In my own case, a rising PSA shortly after surgery meant radiotherapy. That was good but, a few months later, it was rising again. The advice was check it again in 3 months but I decided it was time to start doing more for myself. I can't prove the diet made a difference but PSA was falling on the next test and undetectable 6 months later. It has remained undetectable since (18 months). The principles are simple. Cancer loves sugar. Carbohydrates get converted to glucose which triggers insulin production (along with other hormones) that force-feeds the cancer. So minimize the carbs, minimize the insulin production and stop force-feeding the cancer. Stress the tumor and give whatever treatment you're having its very best chance. It really is a no-brainer! And a keto diet has some very special features; 1. It is safe. Used in hundreds of US hospitals for childhood epilepsy (Altho there are precautions you need to look at) 2. You don't have to wait years for the results of the trials. 3. It can only help any other treatment. 4. It's much easier to live with than I ever would have imagined (thanks to my wife's cooking). 5. There is no financial outlay. From my perspective, there is no down side. The worst possible result from the clinical trials would be that it made no difference. If you have any interest at all, don't hesitate to get in touch. Best wishes Peter
  5. URO Today Newsletter has a number of links in their Prostate Cancer Daily Newsletter. EAU 17 Conference: The Future of Molecular and Functional Imaging is one of those items. The link below is maybe an insight to the future of Imaging . https://www.urotoday.com/recent-abstracts/urologic-oncology/prostate-cancer/98678-eau-pca-17-the-future-of-molecular-and-functional-imaging.html
  6. Last week
  7. Dr says wait before starting ADT

    Report post I had my prostate removed last year had radiation, my psa is 2.0 I had a bone scan that is negative and an MRI that showed one lymph nod that was positive. My doctor suggest to have that removed which I did a few months ago. My psa is still at 2.0 my doctor has suggested to wait and see to not rush into hormone treatment. Would like any feed back if anyone else has had a similar problem I'm a healthy man of 74 runner for over 40yrs still skydive and still am working in my business as a collision repairman. There is no history of cancer that I know of in my family.Thank you for your time.Mike You say an MRI scan showed one metastasis in a lymph node. My guess is that where there is one met, there may be dozens, or hundreds but they are too small to be detected my MRI, or what I have been told is now best, the PsMa CT-PET Gallium-68 scan. Unfortunately, cancer can make an unwanted visit regardless of having no history in a family and despite just how healthily and actively we live our lives. Maybe the only way to be really sure Pca won't get a man is for him to have it removed well before Psa moves up to more than twice normal, and at age 55, so that full nerve sparing can be done so your sex life and urination should remain undisturbed after a full recovery. However, it is always possible surgeons will leave a few prostate cells behind, and if they have DNA that could ever become cancer in future then there still is a risk that they will become cancer and if that happens then it may take slightly longer for the Pca to become a damn monster that pursues a man to the grave. But at 70, I know I have certainty is that I'll die some day. I was diagnosed with a Gleason 9 after Psa only went to 5, and it was inoperable. I had EBRT and ADT for 2 years, Psa < 0.1, then I paused the ADT and Psa shot up to 8.0 in 6 months, and maybe it spread to many places. I re-started ADT, and got 4 more years of suppression, then Psa went up without pause to ADT. I had 31Grey of IMRT to PG 15 mths ago at Epworth. I began Cosadex daily, and that worked for only 6 months, Psa went up again. But PsMa scan last June showed about 15 mets in lymph nodes and bones, and Cosadex was stopped because doc said that when Cosadex fails, it helps Pca grow. The bone mets excluded me from being recommended for BAT, an easy treat where after being on ADT for 6 years, I take 400mg Testosterone shot once a month and have Psa test just before the shots. This is all explained online, but 1 x 400ml testo is only what a body builder might use twice a week for years to grow muscle ( to make himself look stupid ). BAT is being trialled in USA as John Hopkins Hospital. Anyway, now I have been on Zytiga, ie abiraterone for last month; it is a more powerful form of ADT and I am staying on monthly shots of Lucrin. The abiraterone might give suppression for a couple of years, if it works at all. During last Feb when Psa was only 0.5, I had both knee joints replaced because of bad genetics. Everyone knew it was likely I was riddled with cancer, but docs were happy to do it. But now I can walk without pain, and continue cycling 220km average per week at average speed 24kph. I have no idea if this slows my cancer down, but most days I feel 20, and I overtake many who are 30 years younger. So I have no symptoms, but just have the effects of chemical castration and radiation since 2010. The effects of these completely mutilated my sexual abilities, but I am quite continent and bowel function is fine, sense of humour and gregarious nature is untouched, so most days I am quite happy, and I have resting HR of 50, BMI < 25, docs are delighted to see me arrive to have a chat dressed in lycra. I thought I might qualify for Lutetium177 theranostic treatment, but it seems I just ain't crook enough and it may be years until I am crook enough. Peter Mac Hospital in Melbourne trialled Lu177 last year and announced results recently and overall it seems good but they are doing another trial later this year. But a condition to be accepted to trial is that you must be on chemotherapy when all else has begun to fail, and only chemo remains, so if abiraterone gets my Psa low, and no chemo is needed, then I won't be allowed to be in the trial. There are hundreds of men in far worse condition than I am. So, when one hears about some new treatment like Lu177, be wary, because the trial only finished 9 months ago and nobody knows yet how patients will be in say another 9 months, or 2 years. Lu177 is easy peasy to treat, just sit in a chair and take clear liquid injected to a vein. But side effects are dry mouth because saliva glands are badly affected, maybe dry eyes as well, and what's the use of me having Lu177 soon if it does not give me remission, and I need something else in 2 year's time? It may be better to just let abiraterone work for 2 years without any side effects and then have Lu177, and hopefully in 2 years time the Lu177 will have improved, or been changed to something better, and sure, all of us are impatient, but the reality is that we must live and die as developments and treatment approvals and allow. Maybe targeted chemo will prove effective, and it is now not uncommon to hear reports of DNA testing of cancer cells and then use of the best chemo most likely to work. The other thing to remember that not all Pca cells can be suppressed with ADT, and certainly not all Pca mets, and for a few unlucky fellows, the PsMa tests or Lu177 does not work at all much because nothing can SEE where all the Pca and mets are. The salvation radiation I had at Epworth last year seems to have reduced my Pca in PG, which is now a fried mess, and spread to nearby organs has not happened, but all these many mets have sprung up like musrooms, and they will kill me if they are not dealt with and the only way is by systemic treatment, no more EBRT for me. I may have to fight for next 10years, but before psMa test appeared, it was said that if a CT scan spotted bone cancer, you had 95% chance of death within 5 years, with last year being bleedin awful. PsMa tests are detecting smaller mets, maybe I have 7+ years. But I will cycle until I just cannot. Life is good, even though its a reduced life. There are so many far worse off, who suffer more, so be grateful. Regards to all, Patrick Turner.
  8. Dr says wait before starting ADT

    Oops - thanks for picking up my error, Sisira. I meant to say six rounds, not six months, Michael. Alan
  9. Dr says wait before starting ADT

    I agree with Alan. What he really means I think should be ADT combined with 6 rounds of chemotherapy and not 6 months. Sisira
  10. Dr says wait before starting ADT

    G'day Michael, Could you indicate the last couple of PSA values and dates prior to your RP, and the RP hisopathology reported Gleason score, percentage of tissue positive for PCa, positive / negative capsular margins and any excised lymph nodes that were positive for PCa ? These (and future Gallium or PET/CT imaging of at least your pelvis and abdomen) are important data that point to how aggressive current and future treatment might need to be. Your subsequent MRI-positive node indicates metastasis - quite possibly early stage, but the extent of which is hard to guess at without the above info. Based on recent practice-changing trials, the trend seems to be to hit such cases early and hard - including ADT combined with 6 months of chemotherapy while the patient is fit and early-stage (i.e. 'not too mutated'). These points (which are comments on your post, not medical treatment advice) could be the focus of an early chat with your urologist - AND with a medical oncologist. Stay in touch - and best wishes, Alan
  11. It’s not too late to register for Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia (PCFA) Ask The Experts Webcast and find out what you need to know about prostate cancer. Thank you to those who have already registered, we’ve had an overwhelming response and some incredible questions. WHEN Wednesday 20 Sept 2017 7:00pm – 8:00pm (AEST) WHERE Online – join via computer, smart phone and tablet. Registration is essential. Our expert panel of health professionals including: a radiation oncologist, urologist, prostate cancer specialist nurse and a general practitioner will cover: Risk factors and diagnosis Navigating different options after a diagnosis Treatment and management of side effects Support available to men and their families Questions from the audience To register and for further information go to www.pcfa.org.au/asktheexperts Share with others who may wish to attend. Forward this email to a friend Not available to join us live? Stay connected and view webcast post recording viaonlinecommunity.pcfa.org.au
  12. It’s not too late to register for Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia (PCFA) Ask The Experts Webcast and find out what you need to know about prostate cancer. Thank you to those who have already registered, we’ve had an overwhelming response and some incredible questions. WHEN Wednesday 20 Sept 2017 7:00pm – 8:00pm (AEST) WHERE Online – join via computer, smart phone and tablet. Registration is essential. Our expert panel of health professionals including: a radiation oncologist, urologist, prostate cancer specialist nurse and a general practitioner will cover: Risk factors and diagnosis Navigating different options after a diagnosis Treatment and management of side effects Support available to men and their families Questions from the audience To register and for further information go to www.pcfa.org.au/asktheexperts Share with others who may wish to attend. Forward this email to a friend Not available to join us live? Stay connected and view webcast post recording viaonlinecommunity.pcfa.org.au
  13. Dr says wait before starting ADT

    I had my prostate removed last year had radiation, my psa is 2.0 I had a bone scan that is negative and an MRI that showed one lymph nod that was positive. My doctor suggest to have that removed which I did a few months ago. My psa is still at 2.0 my doctor has suggested to wait and see to not rush into hormone treatment. Would like any feed back if anyone else has had a similar problem I'm a healthy man of 74 runner for over 40yrs still skydive and still am working in my business as a collision repairman. There is no history of cancer that I know of in my family.Thank you for your time.Mike
  14. Can we please set up a meeting with Gail Wiseman of Astellas ASAP to try to find a way forward on this. Some patients like me are getting huge benefits on clinical trial with pre chemo Enzalutamide. Denying this benefit to those in our wider community who could also benefit is criminal in my view. If we can do it with Xofigo we can do it with pre chemo Enzalutamide. Regards Tony
  15. Earlier
  16. Hi Jim Thanks for your prompt response I am working through the pros and cons. One thought is that Xtandi is a more advanced approach in that it working on the receptors in Pca rather than androgen deprivation. But concerns about fatigue & seizures are an issue. Hypertension has been a problem for me in the past but now is well controlled with meds. It is a dilemma for me but I guess I will get there. Chalkie
  17. Chalkie asks: I am now having to choose between Zytiga and Xtandi. Is there a forum for this? Any suggestions? Jim Marshall (not a doctor) said ... A recent trial for men with metastatic prostate cancer who were no longer responding to ADT alone (mCRPC) showed similar outcomes on both drugs. So, it appears your doctor could recommend either, unless they are worried about how a particular side effect may affect you personally: If you have a health condition that could be made worse by possible seizure or fatigue, your doctor may steer away from Xtandi. If you have a health condition that could be made worse by possible by increased blood pressure, low potassium, or increased liver enzymes, your doctor may steer away from Zytiga. ... end Jim A link to an article on this can be found here: Abiraterone and Enzalutamide equivalent as first-line therapy in metastatic hormone therapy- resistant prostate cancer
  18. Anandron (nilutimide)

    Thanks Allan, your comments have given me confidence in looking to the future. Now almost a year on I have finished 7 seven infusions of chemo - which I handled very well - in that my life didn't change much. Side effects were the loss of hair and finger nails gave me some grief with all of them becoming septic. But they are OK now and my hair is coming back. Peripheral neuropathy continues to be an issue. PSA came down from 40+ to plateau at 20 for the last 3 infusions. Now 6 weeks after chemo has finished PSA is on the rise and bone scans etc reveal a that tumours have increased in size - but I am not in pain and I am asymptomatic and no change in my general health and disposition is evident. I am still on the happy pills. Of course I am continuing with Zoladex and have been on denosumab (Xgeva) for six months [side effects of xgeva has been a drippy nose - better than a drippy dick] Saw my oncologist on Monday and I need to choose between Xtandi and Zytiga. I am back to him in 3 weeks. There may be some trials but nothing definite and my thinking is that it is better to choose the devil I know than a trial. So I am now reading up on both. I am thinking that I need to weigh up the side effects and which regime may be the easiest to follow. Did you have a choice? and can you offer me some help in deciding which pill to take. Cheers Chalkie
  19. The long awaited trial results of the phase II trials at Peter Mac were presented at the ESMO European Society Medical Oncologists over the weekend,8th & 9th of September 2017. Near on 23000 participants from 131 Countries are in attendance at the conference. Dr. Hofman and colleagues from Melbourne, Australia presented results from their phase II Lutetium-177 PSMA trial for the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. This treatment provides an opportunity for new therapeutic technology to be used to improve survival. Another interesting article presented at the same session was Targeted Alpha Therapy(TAT) by Professor Johann de Bono from the UK He discussed the future of targeted alpha therapy. Dr. de Bono shared a comprehensive slide delineating the timeline of alpha-emitting radionuclide therapy in oncology, specifically highlighting radium-223 approval in mCRPC in 2013 and the first patient being treated with Thorium-227 in 2016. The study conclusion: In conclusion, this phase II trial demonstrates that 177Lu-PSMA treatment for patients with mCRPC who have failed standard therapy provides encouraging response rates with acceptable toxicity, in addition to improved QoL and pain reduction. Based on this trial, we eagerly await the results of larger studies with long-term follow-up. This information is on the URO Today site.. Lutetium Trial Results September 2017 ESMO (This is on UroToday. It is only available to UroToday members, so you will have to join up to see it. Joining is free.) countries are attending the 2017 Congress, being held 8 to 12 September in Madrid 23,000 participants from 131 countries are attending th2017 Congress, being held 8 to 12 September in Madrid
  20. Hi all, Is there a written summary of what Mark Moyad said? Was there anything useful within what he said? Did he tell us of some new treatment now available, and not "years away" which might work? I hazard a guess that this is what we all really want to know. So much is said about Pca, but what is really wanted is where to get a cure if at all possible. I have not had a chance to fully wade through 2 hours of discussions. Try to keep well, but Unkel Fait is watching....... Patrick Turner.
  21. Due to a minor malfunction in Jim's brain, this video was unavailable for a few hours. The video is available again. Jim's brain continues to be a problem. Jim
  22. Due to a minor malfunction in Jim's brain, this video was unavailable for a few hours. The video is available again. Jim's brain continues to be a problem. Jim
  23. Safe Travel and enjoy the conference. Cheers David PS Remember the duty free!!!!!!
  24. Safe travels, welcome back to La-La land, much look forward to shaking your hands.... Onward & upwards, rick
  25. For the first time, the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia (PCFA) is sending an official delegation to the Prostate Cancer Research Institute (PCRI) annual patient conference. The PCRI conference is the largest prostate cancer patient conference in the world. It is moderated by Dr Mark Moyad, and regularly features Dr Charles (Snuff) Myers, and other well known medical oncologists, urologists and radiation oncologists. Our members Jim Marshall, Nev Black and Steve Cavill are on their way today to the PCRI conference in this official PCFA delegation.
  26. Have your say on Xofigo (Radium 223) on the PBS Xofigo® (radium Ra 223), is being considered at the November 2017 Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) meeting for listing on the Pharmaceutical Benefit Scheme (PBS). There is an opportunity for patients and the prostate cancer community (carers, doctors, organisations etc) to make submission directly to the PBAC. The Australian Advanced Prostate Cancer Support Group Executive Committee will be making a submission. We will post more details of what to say in a submission in mid-September, but if you know what you wish to say now: The preferred method is via an online form. Click this sentence to be taken to the online form. Or via email CommentsPBAC@health.gov.au. The consumer comments are open to until 4 October. Some details of Xofigo treatment are in our YouTube video: Treatment for metastatic prostate cancer in the bones:
  27. As Jim knows, we posed this very question to Dr. Moyad 10 days ago .... Jim - I would be tempted to send Dr. Moyad Dr. Morgans' article and the discussion between her and Chuck Ryan, since Dr. M recognized the importance of the question but didn't have a great answer yet. I recently recommended Dr. Morgans to two gents seeking GU med oncs - one in Chicago where she has just moved to Northwestern, and one in Tennessee where she has just left (Vanderbilt). Our Chicago guy was able to make contact, in fact received a charming e-mail back, and has an upcoming appointment to see her. As always Jim, thanks so much for the UroToday links - I have already sent them on to several folks.
  28. Jim Marshall (not a doctor) said ... Dr Alicia Morgans, a medical oncologist, is AssistantProfessor of Medicine at the Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, USA. Dr Morgans is an expert in the design and reporting of clinical trials. She travels the world talking to conferences of medical oncologists about this. When Dr Morgans was in Australia recently to address such a conference, I had the opportunity to interview her for a series of YouTube videos on "Bones and Advanced Prostate Cancer". If you missed those videos, there is a link at the bottom of this post. In the recent Phone-in Meeting we had with medical oncologist Dr Mark Moyad, Dr Moyad reported on the important research that has been published in 2017. Along with a host of useful information, Dr Moyad mentioned clinical trials LATITUDE,STAMPEDE and CHAARTED. These trials all showed that certain groups of men with metastatic prostate cancer got longer survival if they added either Docetaxel chemotherapy or Abiraterone to the standard treatment (hormone therapy, ADT). If you missed that meeting, there is a link at the bottom of this post. No research shows which is better to add to hormone therapy first - chemo or abiraterone. So which treatment do doctors offer first? Today Dr Morgans addressed her fellow medical oncologists and urologists in UroToday about what treatment she will offer men who have metastatic prostate cancer that is still hormone sensitive - men who are just starting hormone therapy and men whose hormone therapy is keeping their PSA low.(Doctor's shorthand for this men is mHSPC - metastatic hormone sensitive prostate cancer.) My translation of Dr Morgan's words: She offers chemo first to men who are fit enough (high performance status), followed by abiraterone. ... end Jim Dr Morgans said ... should we consider giving both treatments to all patients with a performance status suitable for chemotherapy, or should we avoid the side effects of chemotherapy in patients who will not benefit and simply give everyone abiraterone only? Since we cannot identify which patients fall into which category, this could be a complicated question to answer. From my perspective, the answer seems somewhat straightforward. Until we demonstrate that one group of patients benefits from one approach but not the other, I will offer all interested patients with an acceptable performance status treatment with docetaxel, followed by treatment with abiraterone. Part of this stems from my unwillingness to withhold a potentially beneficial treatment from anyone based on my assumptions that a patient would not be interested in chemotherapy ... Click this sentence to read the whole article by Dr Morgans. (This article is on UroToday. It is only available to members, so you will have to join up to see it. Joining is free.) Click this sentence to see a half hour video where Dr Morgans discusses this with Dr Charles Ryan for the benefit of fellow medical oncologists. (This video is on UroToday. It is only available to members, so you will have to join up to see it. Joining is free.) Click this sentence to see our series of YouTube videos with Dr Alicia Morgans on bones and advanced prostate cancer. Click this sentence to see our YouTube video of our recent phone-in meeting with Dr Mark Moyad: Prostate Cancer Research Report 2017.
  1. Load more activity
×