Jump to content

Latest Posts

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Today
  2. Thans for everyone's contribution on this subject. Truly appreciated. Nev Black
  3. Yesterday
  4. Many thanks David. reference was made to ‘a break through pill’ this implies that it is fast acting in providing relief? less than 20mins? PeterA
  5. Last week
  6. There are a wide variety of who charges what, and for the person who must pay out-of-pocket, it behooves that person to check around, as well as encourage the treating physician to assist, in finding the least expensive location for radiation treatment. Keep in mind that there are many other radiation and ancillary services (eg, weekly status checks, the computed tomography simulation, imaging, laboratory tests) that are delivered and billed before or during the course of treatment and would affect the total cost of care. What is most disturbing to the individual who must pay out-of-pocket are the charges when Medicare is the payer, and the astronomical increase in charges to the individual who does not have Medicare. Even insurers may have differing arrangements for charges with radiologists, hospitals, or other facilities who provide radiation services wherein the individual insured may have co-pays higher than that of a different insurer. Work is underway in the U.S. pressing for more transparency in knowing radiation costs; hopefully that will bear some fruit.
  7. Stereotactic to mets at Epworth Melbourne, 2016 and 2019 (2 spots ea time) Invoice cost about S12k ea time, but Medicare Safety Net means actual cost around $1700 ea treatment, plus PSMA scans @ $700 ea. Travel and Accommodation in Melbourne at my own expense.
  8. I had very similar IMRT with Calypso at Epworth in 2016, and to 2 upper chest lymph nodes which were the first of 2 mets to appear in PsMa Ga68 scan at Bridge Rd in Melbourne. I am not insured, so I was invoiced $26,000, and Uncle Medicare coughed up $12,000, but Epworth paid for 30 days accommodation at Ryder-Cheshire at Ivanhoe, plus paid for a lot of taxi fares, when there were no voluntary car drivers to ferry ppl to several hospitals each day. I do not know if the IMRT worked at all. I had EBRT to my inoperable PG in 2010 after first 6 months of ADT. Psa went up while continuing ADT into 2016, so extra EBRT to PG was not feasible at Canberra Hospital hence I took option offered at Epworth. I also began Cosadex that kept Psa low for only 6 months before beginning Zytiga in addition to ADT. I really doubt Epworth is a non profit hospital; its private, and the idea of any private company not operating for profit is an oxymoron. And the Epworth fix was based on what a Dr Shultz in USA had published in American Medical Clinical Journal in 2011 where he wrote that his "salvation" IMRT gave remission in 47 patients. I had to have radio beacons inserted to PG for Calypso to aim correctly for the 26 fractions of RT. So 10 days before IMRT began a uro doc inserted 3 beacons into PG using "applicator" ie, 5mm dia needle while under anaesthetic and through perineum. I don't know how many stabs at PG were made to get beacons in right position, but after I came out of anaesthetic and while in recovery, I got big bleeding and blood clots and at 2am next am needed a catheter put, and the kept me in hospital for 2 days costing about $800 per day. The bleeding should NOT have happened but docs at Epworth were so dumb they didn't know that even a minor operation of beacon insertion was going to lead to massive bleeding due to previous EBRT of 70Grey I had in 2010 as primary treatment. A specialist doc came to see me on sunday am on 2nd day and he said he's done 1,500 brachy therapies and had only 1.4% of cases where a man bled a lot. That was bullshit to me because when BT is done, its before the PG tissues have been affected by RT, so after BT, most men stop bleeding within minutes and heal up, despite maybe 100 pellet insertions. So why did the BT specialist cite the rarity of my condition when any one else, even Dr Blind Freddy, should have known I'd bleed. I was the first patient in Oz to have the salvation RT where the initial treatment was EBRT. The IMRT I had was 31Grey, so that brought total RT to PG to 101. To stop damage to rectum, the uro doc also inserted a hydrogel pad 3cm dia and 1cm thick - maybe, but a very small amount of gunk. That prevented some extra damage to rectum. After returning home to ACT after 5 weeks in Melbourne, I was OK for a fortnight, Psa went down, and then I had The Most Appalling 2months of radiation colitis of the bowel where I became a poo spraying entity. That problem eased off, and I continued good QOL and cycling. So the private hospital was not unable to make cock ups. I don't regret getting the extra IMRT, but it Calypso IMRT is a bit overated IMHO, because beams of rays diffuse as they pass through the body no matter how well the rays are aimed. Its known that BT can deliver 150 Grey to PG which may be needed to kill Pca cells, and without damage to bowels. But with such high amount of RT, damage to nerves and prostatic urethra can be significant, with incontinence later. But I am still fully continent now though, so if RT had such a small effect on my healthy tissue, maybe it wasn't ever going to be a fix for Pca, and most of the Pca suppression was with ADT, Cosadex, and Zytiga. I searched for evidence that Dr Shultz's claims about salvation radiation were true and found none at all, so he may have done hundreds patients, but said he had 47 cases of remission. Remissions of Pca are scarce as hen's teeth, so I figured Dr Shultz was making a claim too good to be true and Epworth based my treatment in what may have been bullshit. I discussed all this in a few emails with boss doc at Epworth, and I nearly quit my treatment there, but finally gave my "uninformed consent" to allow him to proceed. The giving of IMRT in Epworth was done very professionally and I could see that direction of beams were not same at used in 2010 EBRT. But a friend who had a full amount of RT by Calypso to a previous site of his RP had Pca continue on afterwards, and almost nothing the docs could do prevented him dying 3 years after diagnosis. Patrick Turner.
  9. Here is some info I saved as to the cost of first-line radiation treatment in the U.S. if you don't have health insurance to cover that cost: July 1, 2016 - Trends in the use of radiation for primary (first-line) treatment of prostate cancer A few median cost of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy, Proton Beam Radiation Therapy, and Brachytherapy: Median cost of Stereotactic Body Radiation (SBRT): $27,145 (picking up in use) Median cost of Proton Beam Radiation Therapy (PBRT): $54,706 Median cost of Brachytherapy: $17,183 (lowest cost of the three but declining in use) http://tinyurl.com/hy32yk7
  10. My private Urologist's go to Oncologist is in a public hospital, so no cost to me either. Both my brothers also had private Urologists who treated them in public hospitals too.
  11. Agenda Friday 17 January (one week early for Australia Day weekend) Roundtable discussion Anyone with a new story, an update to an old story, or with a question? Any member who wishes is welcome to contribute here, or just listen. Apology? Post a reply on the forum. Start with the Go to this Topic button (bottom of this email). You must dial in - we do NOT dial you. Landline - Anywhere in Australia - 25 cents 1300 289 804 (landline call from anywhere in Australia) (cost 25 cents) When asked, enter the Access Code 44 48 67 38# (no spaces needed) You will be asked your name and business when entering the conference. Something like: 'Bill Smith from Perth' would work well. Mobile to that number - Anywhere - Your phone plan cost Some mobile plans may charge more for 1300 numbers. Best check your plan, or use one of the local numbers below. Mobile local - Anywhere - Your phone plan cost City Local Number Canberra 02 6210 0851 Sydney 02 9696 0774 Hobart 03 6218 0647 Melbourne 03 8687 0635 Brisbane 07 3811 0988 Gold Coast 07 5560 0956 Adelaide 08 8220 0836 Darwin 08 8989 0817 Perth 08 9460 0829 When asked, enter the Access Code 44 48 67 38# (no spaces needed) You will be asked your name when entering the conference. [At a meeting time, these numbers and codes will often be on each page of the website for members.] Phone numbers and code are only in emails. Problem? Contact Jim Time 9:30am - 11:00am Eastern Standard Time (Queensland) The formal phone-in meeting ends after 90 minutes. The lines are kept open for up to an hour after that for members to informally chat. Daylight savings times Brisbane 9:30am Sydney, Melbourne, Hobart: 10:30am Adelaide, 10:00am Perth 7:30am Winter times Brisbane 9:30am Sydney, Melbourne, Hobart 9:30am Adelaide 9:00am Perth 7:30am Daylight saving ends first Sunday in April Daylight saving starts first Sunday in October Apologies From. Late starters Maybe you haven't had access to the agenda or you have late breaking news you would like to share. Tell the chairman here at the beginning of the meeting that you would like to speak, and he will fit you in - probably later, perhaps right now if that suits. Roundtable - new stories, updates, questions Any member who wishes is welcome to contribute here. Formal end The Chair will declare the formal part of the teleconference closed at his discretion, perhaps around 11am. The teleconference lines will be kept open until at least 11:30 for anyone who wishes to continue discussions, update his health, or just chat. Informal chat Any topic you like - topics we didn't reach, something discussed earlier you wish to comment on, an update on your health, how your new boat is going, moaning about the weather, anything that you wish to say. Disclaimer This Community does not give medical advice. No members are authorised to give medical advice. Ask your doctor if you hear anything here that you think may be related to your treatment. Mobile phone warning The costs of mobile calls are nothing to do with the Advanced Prostate Cancer Support Group or with PCFA. They are between you and your phone provider (Optus, Telstra, Virgin, Vodafone, etc). If you dial one of the capital city numbers given above from a mobile phone, the cost to you will be the cost on your mobile phone plan. If your plan gives you free, or low cost local calls, and you are in one of these cities, it should be free, or a local call. If your plan gives you free, or local cost national calls that should work too. Be sure - call your provider, give the number you might be calling, and check the cost for you to call that number. Speaking time We want many voices to be heard. If you are a member listed to speak below, the chair will probably expect you to take no more than about 5 minutes on presentation so there is plenty of time for others to respond. Special Guest Speakers are invited to speak for 10-15 minutes, then field questions. Guidelines No noise House - radio, TV, computer, pets, other phones, conversation Yourself - mute button, or mouthpiece away from mouth Phone - call waiting off (#43#), Mute button or hang up to leave the room. No mute button? ##4 to mute, ##5 to unmute. Cordless phone - don't carry, put on folded handkerchief to limit reverberation Other calls - Please do NOT use call waiting or another line on the same phone to take another call - members around Australia are left listening to your 'hold' music until you return. Speaker phone Please do NOT use a speaker phone, unless you are very good at keeping it Mute, and at lifting and using the hand piece when you wish to join in the conversation. Mobile phone You will need enough charge for the length of the call, or take the call with your charger plugged in. Speaking Speak clearly into mouthpiece in ordinary voice. Say who you are when signing in, and each time you speak. Listen for the gavel. The Chair may need to interrupt. It's a meeting of 20 people, not a simple phone conversation. If you are not one of the two people in the particular conversation at the time, keep your mute button down and let others contribute. Help the secretary by later emailing details for the minutes. Restarting You may hang up and sign in again as many times as necessary. Sometimes we may have to restart the meeting - dial in again. With everyone calling at once you may need to try more than once. Future phone-in support group meetings Fourth Friday of each month, except: January (One week late for Australia Day) and December (One week early for Christmas) Phone-in support group meeting dates 2019 22 November 20 December (one week early for Christmas) Phone-in support group meeting dates 2020 17 January (one week early for Australia Day) 28 February 27 March 24 April 22 May 26 June 24 July 28 August 25 September 23 October 27 November 18 December (one week early for Christmas) Changes or questions If you wish to update us about any changes in your health or treatment, or have a question you would like answered or discussed, or you would like to talk about joining a teleconference group, let us know. Then we can put it high on the agenda so it doesn't get lost - just reply to this email, or use Contact Jim on JimJimJimJim.com. Face-to-a-name meetings South East Queensland and Northern NSW Saturday 11:00am for lunch at noon Victoria Saturday 11:00am for lunch at noon Sydney Need a volunteer to organise a central venue: Contact Jim or Nev 11:00am for lunch at noon This message has been sent to you because you are a member of the Australian Advanced Prostate Cancer Support Group. Visit JimJimJimJim.com and click on Contact Jim if this is a problem.
  12. GrahamW

    Chemotherapy

    Hi Brian - it's a long story, but in summary it has been a lot of Zoladex hormone therapy plus some radiotherapy. Late 2006 - late 2008: 8 x Zoladex 10.8mg implants (that's one every 3 months). PSA <0.01. Late 2010: PSA rising, all the scans done (nothing detected), 2 x 10.8mg implants. PSA again not measurable after these. Late 2012: PSA rising, 2 x 10.8mg implants. PSA fell again, not quite so low but I can't remember what it got down to. Late 2014: PSA rising, 2 x 10.8mg implants. Early 2015: PSA still rising, Zoladex failing, off to Peter Mac in Melbourne for a PSMA/PET (gallium-68) scan. March - May 2015: Radiotherapy to attack the spots shown by that scan. Three-monthly Zoladex continues. PSA falling. September 2015: PSA still falling, Zoladex stopped. June 2016: PSA rising again, had another PSMA/PET scan. This showed too many mets for more radiotherapy. Back on Zoladex to see if it would somehow work again, but it didn't, so then came the Docetaxel. Between the Docetaxel and the current cabazitaxel I had a bit over 2 years on Xtandi (enzalutamide). And always Zoladex every 3 months plus Xgeva (denosumab) for the bone mets. I have had so much Zoladex by now that I tend to forget about it (except when the stab is imminent). There are no side effects from it that I can identify any more.
  13. Had mine at St George public hospital in Sydney, no cost to me as it was covered bu Medicare
  14. Nev I had radiotherapy at a later stage - after resistance to Zoladex - in 2015 at the Epworth in Richmond (Melbourne), a private not-for-profit hospital. I had 35 doses of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to the prostate area (where it used to be), plus 10 doses of higher intensity stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SBRT) to a lymph node. So this doesn't really answer your question as I can't tell you how much the IMRT part was, but the total invoiced cost was almost $25k. The whole thing cost me $1700.
  15. Many of the men in this support group have had radiation therapy soon after the primary treatment, Radical Prostatectomy. Does anyone have a baseball park cost of this radiation treatment. Nev
  16. Brian G

    Chemotherapy

    GrahamW I am interested in what happened to you between your chemo in 2006 and next treatment in 2015? How long did your psa stay low, etc. I had an RP in 2017, Gleason 7, seminal vesicle and nerve involvement, positive margin. Seven weeks RT last year and on 6 months ADT now. Next test in Feb. Thanks Brian
  17. timbaker

    Mindfulness and meditation app (on Android)

    I fully endorse meditation as a wonderful therapy. I have become quite a devoted Vipassana meditator and have done four 10-day retreats in Pomona in the Sunshine Coast hinterland. I find the benefits really wonderful as it quietens the mind and allows you to live in the present moment rather than worrying about the past and future. I won't evangelise too heavily and I'm sure it's not for everyone and a 10-day retreat is not to be taken lightly but has been transformative for me and I know some others dealing with a diagnosis. Course schedule for Pomona is here: https://www.dhamma.org/en/schedules/schrasmi
  18. Jim Marshall (not a doctor) said ... You need to know A number of members have told me how mindfulness or meditation has helped them cope with their prostate cancer journey. Some are very strong in their praise of the technique. Sam Harris, a current champion of mindfulness and meditation (without religion), has produced an app called Waking Up: A Meditation Course (Android only). The app tells about mindfulness and meditation, teaches how to do it, and provides practice sessions. It costs USD$15 per month. The app has been downloaded more than 100,000 times. Of the 7,808 people who have rated it, most rated it 5 stars (out of 5 stars). Sam Harris offers both a money back guarantee, and free access to the app in case of hardship. My thoughts are that if you can access a good teacher that might be best, but if that is a problem, this app could work for you. You don't need to know Although I am attracted to the notion, mindfulness and meditation have never really taken fully on me. I have had a few short sessions at events I have attended, and I have downloaded and tried several apps (but not this Sam Harris one). However, I sometimes do breathing and other distraction exercises to cope with strong pain or very emotional events. You really don't need to know Sam Harris says that people who don't come to a deep understanding of themselves may be helped to do so by taking LSD or psilocybin. He says that is how he came to a deep understanding himself. He does not recommend that for other people. NOR DO I. Back in '66, at a poetry reading by Russian poet Yevgeny Yevtushenko I met Timothy Leary, an American psychologist who advocated exploring these psychedelic drugs under controlled conditions. Although the air was thick with the pungent smell of another more common drug that it may have influenced my mind, he had no chance of convincing me. A friend (a neighbour of Wendy's) had shortly before taken LSD at a party in the city. He had crawled out the window of a third floor toilet. He was badly injured. Before he took to psychedelic drugs, we used to talk for hours, sometimes all night about the sort of questions that absorb some young people. After he recovered, however, we drifted apart. ... end Jim The app can be found at: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.wakingup.android If this link no longer works, search for: "Waking up" Sam Harris If you don't have an android phone or tablet, Sam Harris has written a book "Waking Up" which you can get from Goodreads, or as a spoken book from Audible (spoken by Sam Harris himself).
  19. GrahamW

    Chemotherapy

    Thanks Nev for your best wishes. I'm doing OK but we are all a bit different. However I'm with Chalkie on the problem of length off the tee. It puts a lot of pressure on the second shot, when it used to be a mid iron but is now a fairway wood. One thing I forgot to mention in my comments on tolerance to Cabazitaxel is that I tend to get quite dizzy in the first week or so after an infusion. It seems that may be due to reduced red blood cells, and in fact a couple of times the blood count been down a bit when I turned up for the next infusion. Dizzy as in don't stand up too fast, and needing to sit down after a bit of exertion. It's annoying.
  20. alanbarlee

    Chemotherapy

    G'day Peter, It's an unfortunate fact that, while men find the side effects from ADT manageable, others do get knocked off their perch by it. A couple of thoughts on the symptoms: Hot flashes affect most of us to some extent. Reducing high GI carbs (sugary of flour-based foods), especially at the preferably early evening meal, can help, as can a loose breathable shirt and air movement via a fan. Mood swings and irritability can be helped by an anti-depressant prescription from your GP, and fatigue is best handled by regular aerobic exercise, and by giving yourself permission to have short nana-naps when you feel like it. Have you considered trying a switch from the usual GNRH agonists like Eligard to Firmagon - an antagonist (i.e. works a bit differently)? The side effects are a bit different - and a bit of injection-site discomfort for a day or two is not uncommon - but this class of ADT can be a good option for some. This might be worth raising with your oncologist. Next, are you considering Zytiga or Xtandi in conjunction with your ADT (after your chemo treatment is finished)? Zytiga needs a bit of steroid, and Xtandi can increase fatigue a bit, but both these drugs are usually very effective in controlling the disease, with relatively benign side effects. Again, your oncologist would need to be consulted on this. If toleration of your current treatment is a really critical issue, then a third angle might be clinical trials, e.g. 177-lutetium-PSMA617 (a radiopharmaceutical infusion) without or with combination with other new drugs .This approach would be supported by very sensitive scans to determine your likely responsiveness, and you would get the best possible monitoring and care. Finally, the era of protein and gene testing is here, and you can now be tested for mutations in things like AR-V7, BRCA2 and a number of others - which can guide the choice of therapy at an individual level. There are some promising new and customised drug treatments like Lynparza and Keytruda that are being trialled in this context. All of this is to indicate that there can be more than one way to skin the cat: there are plenty of emerging possibilities to chat over with your oncologist if you're unable to tolerate a given treatment, and to move to if a particular treatment should stop working. Hang in there, Mate - there's likely a solution somewhere in there! Cheers, Alan
  21. Nev Black

    Chemotherapy

    Chalkie, a big thank you for your response and details of your treatment. Congratulations on your Movember fund raising. An absolutely fantastic effort. It is amazing what some men can achieve in the face of advertisity. Today, yourself, Patrick Turner and GrahamW must surely be inspirational to a newly diagnosed advanced prostate cancer patient. Sorry to hear Peter that you are not tolerating hormone therapy all that well. Easy for me to say, hang in there, but I am not suffering like you. Doesn't help you much knowing others are in the same situation as you. Wish I could be of help. Maybe someone out there has a suggestion. Personally, I haven't progressed beyond ADT (Eligard every 28 days) at the moment. As a result I appreciate your experiences being shared with others. May a new treatment, or trial, become available to keep you men going, with quality of life, well into the future. My very best wishes to you all. Nev
  22. Peter bastow

    Chemotherapy

    I've had 13 lots of chemo over 10 months, a week of radiation treatment, now I'm on hormone treatment, not coping with the hot flushes, mood swings and feeling fatigued, the treatments to date have been successful in managing my symptoms, my PSA went from 380 to 11.5, I know there isn't a cure, I feel like I have a time bomb inside of me. Currently I'm thinking why did I have treatment, it's always the side effects that cause problems, people just dont get it. I do my best to keep up my appearance, people say ,"your looking well" I always think if only they knew whats going on under my mask, I haven't told a lot of people that I have advanced cancer, those I have now treat me differently
  23. Patrick Turner

    NEXT STEP AFTER ZOLADEX

    Hi Alan, FDG PET/CT scans were never mentioned when I dealt with Theranostics Australia. But then the FDG assessment is a *new thing* and as time goes by TA probably will want men who want Lu177 to get these FDG scans as well as PsMa scans to assess earlier instead of later whether or not additional treatment with DNA analysis and parp inhibitors - whatever- to try to stop Puff the Magic Prostate Grenade from fully exploding to kill a man too early. I see my onco for another follow-up later this month so I shall ask him about FDG. I am not in remission; it may be said my Pca is under control, but I have no idea for how long. Meanwhile, I have to say I feel real well, and cycled 54km this am across town for a cup of coffee. Patrick Turner.
  24. alanbarlee

    NEXT STEP AFTER ZOLADEX

    Hi again Ian, On lutetium, you might check that an FDG PET/CT is done by the provider, alongside the 68Ga-PSMA11 PET/CT scan. As well as showing that your mets are PSMA-avid (needed for the Lu to work), an FDG scan should ideally match the PSMA scan. If there are mets that show up on FDG but not PSMA, then lutetium will only deal with those that do show up on PSMA, but not the others. When I last enquired (at the PCRI patient conference), Theranostics Australia weren't doing the FDG scan, which means that even with a positive PSMA scan you may not get the result you would be hoping for after having spent a lot of money. (On the other hand, lutetium trials will usually use both scans). If this is still the situation, an alternative systemic treatment, ideally guided by gene analysis, would be good to pursue: there are a number of possibilities there. (Zytiga still seems like a good option, and wouldn't need the gene analysis). Cheers, Alan
  25. spook1958

    NEXT STEP AFTER ZOLADEX

    G'day Alan, I already have the Neuropathy in my feet after Chemo 10 years ago. I normally walk 10ks a day and I attend a Zolodex funded gym session with other PC guys, each week. I am getting balance and muscle back, which takes a weight off the mind. Bone Density in September, was horrendous with high likelihood of fracture for my neck, spin and hips. Nine years on Zolodex and nobody throught to check earlier. Still, An infusion and then taking up the walking, has hopefully sorted that out. Cognitive, not so good. Had to give up work last year because I was unable to to cope with the tasks I had to do on a daily basis. I only lasted as long as I did because I was the boss. I should have stopped a year earlier. But I am coping better now with the pressure off. Still poor short term memory, but long term is okay. Practically given up driving. A friend of mine enjoyed the Patagonia across to Antarctica trip a couple of years ago, sounded like fun. No issue taking your pills with you? I hope to fit the West Coast of Canada, then Alaska and Yukon in this year, followed by the East coast ASAP after, maybe also this year. My Wife is on a live injection weekly, for A.S. and because it has to stay refrigerated she shouldn't go without it for the 2 months it would take to do both sides of Canada in the one trip. I appreciate you blokes responding. Ian
  26. spook1958

    NEXT STEP AFTER ZOLADEX

    G'day Patrick, I guess the DNA testing of the PC will tell if I am a candidate for Lutetium or not. I may be lucky and they will do a study for guys in my position without Bone Mets. I am glad it worked well for you, it gives us all a bit more hope. Ian
  27. Earlier
  28. DesG

    NEXT STEP AFTER ZOLADEX

    Thanks for sharing Alan - you will love Antarctica - will you be crossing the Drake Passage? if so - hope it is reasonable
  29. alanbarlee

    NEXT STEP AFTER ZOLADEX

    Hi Ian, I've had a partly similar history to you - but Gleason '7.5', (50% Gleason 4), nodes only by FDG PT/CT, and no chemo or radiation (yet). I've had great success with Zytiga (2 x 500 mg) plus dexamethasone (0.5 mg) - which has been going now for 6 years (I'm now 78). This has been accompanied by continued Zoladex plus Avodart (0.5 mg on alternate days). My PSA dropped rapidly from its previously androgen-resistant level of 7, and has been below 0.1 (minimum 0.01) for the past 2 ½ years. Side effects of the combo have been minimal - mild neuropathy in the feet, and not much else. We still travel occasionally (Patagonia and Antarctica next week), backed up with walking and gym. Balance, flexibility and leg strength have diminished (other than loss of muscle mass, most of these are probably age-related), but not much else has been going on. Happily, bone density, lipids, glucose, BMI and cognition are all OK, even after 17 years of minimal testosterone. Take from that what you will - but keep in mind that Zytiga is an established PBS treatment, whereas lutetium, although very promising for specific metastatic disease, is not yet through its Phase 3 trialing stage. (You maybe eligible for one of the lutetium combo trials, however, if you happen to not respond - or stop responding - to Zytiga). Best wishes, Alan
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...