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  1. Today
  2. Not to be missed February 20th 2018 Associate Professor Michael Hofman is coming to Prostate Heidelberg in Melbourne to address members on ”Diagnostic & Treatment Paradigms using PET Scans” We have some seats to spare for this Meeting and we extend an invitation to members of our Advanced Group who might be in the Melbourne area on this day to join us for this special event. It’s free - morning tea will be provided but please book in advance by phoning Barry 0400 662 114 or emailing prostateheidelberg@gmail.com Associate Professor Hofman is a nuclear medicine physician at the Centre for Molecular Imaging and Cancer Imaging at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne, this is Australia's only public hospital dedicated to cancer treatment, research and education. He is currently involved in the multi-centre randomized clinical trial of Gallium 68 PSMA PET Scans and the trials of the game changing Lutetium 177 PSMA therapy which is about to commence Australia wide. These trials are cutting edge imaging / treatments for Advanced Metastatic Prostate Cancer. Associate Professor Hofman is one of Australia’s — and possibly one of the World’s — leading physicians specializing in Pet & Radio Tracer Scans & Neuroendocrine Tumors & Theranostic treatments like Lutetium177 . Where : - The Uniting Church Meeting Room, Sneddon Street, Ivanhoe - 10.00am sharp There is a car park adjoining the rooms. Parking is free but it can get busy at times. If you can make it don’t miss this golden opportunity to hear Associate Professor Michael Hoffman’s address on these ground - breaking treatments Presented by PROSTATE HEIDELBERG - CANCER SUPPORT GROUP We are Proudly Affiliated with the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia and the Cancer Council of Victoria PO Box 241 Ivanhoe Vic 3079 Email :- prostateheidelberg@gmail.com Web Site ttp://www.prostateheidelberg.info/
  3. Chuck, This is a very good point on Avodart. I will follow your advice and take it on every third day. I pay for all consultations, treatments and drugs out of my own money like many others who can afford to do it. In my country ( Sri Lanka )government hospitals are full of patients and there are long waiting lists. But if you spend your money here, you have 100% freedom and your choice at any time subject to the available resources and expertise within the country. I also would like to ask why almost all ( known to me in US) who take Avodart, take it daily so long as they use it? Don't they know about its half life? By the way in which country are you living at present? Thank you for writing back to me. Best regards Sisira
  4. Yesterday
  5. Prostate Cancer Continuing Patient, Activist, Mentor Prostate Cancer Treatment over the Years

    Patrick, since dexamethasone is one 0.5mg tablet taken once daily versus the two 5mg prednisone tablets taken daily with Zytiga, this may interest you and other readers: Dexamethasone a Better Partner for Abiraterone Than Prednisolone http://theoncologist.alphamedpress.org/content/20/5/e13.full http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25314055 By the way, I was successful with Zytiga/abiraterone acetate for just a few months short of six years.
  6. Prostate Cancer Continuing Patient, Activist, Mentor Prostate Cancer Treatment over the Years

    Hello Sisira, If you have been taking dutasteride/Avodart daily for 4 to 6 months, it will have established itself in your system. In so doing, you can then change to taking the 0.5mg capsule every other, or even every third day and it will remain just as effective as daily because of its long half-life. This can be a consideration in cost saving if you don’t have health insurance coverage for oral medications. The half-life of Avodart is 5 weeks, and it can take 4 to 6 months for the medication to be totally eliminated from the system once it is stopped. See: http://www.drugs.com/pro/avodart.html and scroll down to “Pharmacokinetics”
  7. Congratulations to both 25+ Heroes ! My admiration and tribute to Chuck for his unparalleled service as a Prostate Cancer Activist,Advocate, and an excellent Mentor. Immediately after my diagnosis in March 2015 for GS9 PCa - T2c No Mx @ 69 Yrs, I hit my PCa as hard as possible with the multimodal protocol RRP + IMRT + ADT2 ( Zoladex 10.8mg continuously for 2 years ). My PSA before RRP was 7.9 ng/ml and since April 2015 up to now has remained at 0.008ng/ml ( checked every 3 months ). Presently I continue with 1 capsule Avodart per day, Vitamin D3 4000IU per day, well balanced diet without red meat and dairy products, some good supplements recommended by Dr.Charles Myers ( oncologist ) and daily physical exercises for 1.5 hours. My other metabolic functions too are being monitored carefully and i have no other problems. 25+ is a good goal setting for me and thank you very much Chuck for your inspiring post and also Patrick for joining the Select Band of PCa survivors. May god bless you both to live as long as you wish! Sisira
  8. I think we may say Chuck has had some good luck to be so alive and well despite having had so many treatments at drugs. I'd have to say I'm having some luck too because before starting Zytiga last July. Psa was 7.2, and tests since then gave 3.8, 2.8 and then 2.0 a week ago. I was told median time for Zytiga to work was 10 months, my oncologist has seen some guys get 2 years. I began taking Duodart which is tamulosin + dutersteride which Chuck said would make Zytiga ( abiraterone ) much more effective but I see no sign it is making any difference; my doc predicted I'd have Psa 2.2 for last test, I got 2.0. Spare a thought for what happens to some who just don't get much luck. One man I know was diagnosed 2.5 years ago but is now on chemo because ADT and salvation radiation after his RP didn't work. Be thankful to be alive at all. Happy new year to all, Patrick Turner
  9. Last week
  10. January 2018 I am currently 25+ years since my diagnosis November 1992, open surgical removal of my prostate gland December 1992, salvage radiation Spring of 1993, recurrence November 1996, and a variety of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) medications from then to continued currently. Have been prescribed as ADT medications over the years with Lupron/leuprolide injections, Casodex or its generic bicalutamide, dutasteride/Avodart, brief Firmagon/degarelix, brief nilutamide/Nilandron, Zytiga/abiraterone acetate accompanied by prednisone or better yet dexamethasone, Metformin/Glucophage accompanied by Vitamin B12 (Vitamin B12 because Metformin can deplete this important Vitamin in the system for some – Vitamin B12 level should be tested to determine if medication required), cabergoline/Dostinex 0.25mg every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday (comes in 0.5mg tablet requiring breaking in two), and Xtandi/enzalutamide for prostate cancer control and management. Also, for bone protection, earlier Fosamax/alendronate but then switched to Prolia/denosumab 60mg injection every 6-months when that medication became available. Current continuing medications because of continuing, lurking prostate cancer: Lupron 6-month 45mg injection, Avodart 0.5 capsule one daily (though after four to six months daily use could be reduced to one capsule every three or even four days because of its long half-life – a money saver for those paying out-of-pocket), Xtandi 4-160mg capsules daily, Metformin 500mg ER (extended release) one tablet in morning, one in evening, accompanied by Vitamin B12 1500mcg one tablet daily, cabergoline 0.25mg (one-half of 0.5mg tablet) every Mon/Wed/Fri. For bone protection: denosumab as Prolia 60mg subcutaneous injection every 6-months. Most recent PSA level 1.090ng/ml, so watching closely to hopefully manage below 2.0ng/ml as long as possible. DISCLAIMER: Please recognize that I am not a Medical Doctor. Rather, I do consider myself a medical detective. I have been an avid student researching and studying prostate cancer as a survivor and continuing patient since 1992. I have dedicated my retirement years to continued deep research and study in order to serve as an advocate for prostate cancer awareness, and, from an activist patient’s viewpoint, as a mentor to voluntarily help patients, caregivers, and others interested develop an understanding of this insidious men’s disease, its treatment options, and the treatment of the side effects that often accompany treatment. There is absolutely no charge for my mentoring – I provide this free service as one who has been there and hoping to make their journey one with better understanding and knowledge than was available to me when I was diagnosed so many years ago. IMPORTANTLY, readers of medical information I may provide are provided this “disclaimer” to make certain they understand that the comments or recommendations I make are not intended to be the procedure to blindly follow; rather, they are to be reviewed as MY OPINION, then used for further personal research, study, and subsequent discussion with the medical professional/physician providing their prostate cancer care. Charles (Chuck) Maack - Prostate Cancer Patient/Activist/Mentor (A mentor should be someone who offers courtesy, professionalism, respect, wisdom, knowledge, and support to help you achieve your goals; would that I succeed) Always as close as the other end of your computer to help address any prostate cancer concerns. "What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others." “A good character is the best tombstone. Those who loved you will remember. Carve your name on hearts, not on marble.” “Sepius Exertus, Semper Paratus, Semper Fortis, Semper Fidelis, Fraters Infinitas” “Often tested, Always Prepared, Always Courageous, Always Faithful, Brothers Forever" Recipient 2008 Us TOO Intl., Inc., Prostate Education & Support Network 1st “Edward C. Kaps Hope Award” Recipient 2012 Prostate Cancer Research Institute (PCRI) “Harry Pinchot Award” Recipient 2016 Us TOO Intl., Inc. Certificate for 20 Years Dedication/Inspiration Published papers: “A Wake Up Call To Men & The Women Who Care For Them” JCPCR-06-00189 Volume 6 issue 1 - 2016: http://tinyurl.com/3djfgve “A Prostate Cancer Patient’s 24-Year (1992-2016) Continuing Journey from Diagnosis to Treatment to Recurrence to Mentoring” JCPCR-04—201604 Volume 4 issue 4 – 2016: http://tinyurl.com/hcxuxv9 “Newly Diagnosed with Prostate Cancer? - A Mentor/Patient Discussion” May 23, 2017 Biomedical Journal of Scientific & Technical Research (BJSTR) http://biomedres.us/pdfs/BJSTR.MS.ID.000110.pdf “Prostate Cancer Advocacy and Mentoring Support” – published November 22, 2017 in the journal “Holistic Approaches in Oncotherapy” HAOT-17-OPN-0004 1.1 (2017): 14-15; https://scientiaricerca.com/srhaot/pdf/SRHAOT-01-00003.pdf
  11. Earlier
  12. Enzalutamide synergized by Metformin

    Have you recently been prescribed enzalutamide/Xtandi and your PSA continues elevation? You may want to consider asking your treating physician to prescribe Metformin to synergize the effect of enzalutamide as concluded in the following paper. I am currently giving this a try with Metformin ER (extended release) 500mg one tablet in the morning, one tablet at bedtime in combination with enzalutamide/XTANDI since initially it appeared enzalutamide without Metformin was effective with a slight drop in PSA level, but then a slow rise. Metformin reverses prostate cancer resistance to enzalutamide by targeting TGF-β1/STAT3 axis-regulated EMT. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28837141 Metformin reverses prostate cancer resistance to enzalutamide by targeting TGF-β1/STAT3 axis-regulated EMT. - PubMed - NCBI www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Cell Death Dis. 2017 Aug 24;8(8):e3007. doi: 10.1038/cddis.2017.417. It should be noted that Metformin can affect the absorption of Vitamin B12 in the system, an important Vitamin as explained in the following paper (and there are many other papers reporting the same), thus one’s Vitamin B12 level should periodically be determined and prescribing of Vitamin B12 considered if the appropriate level is below normal: http://www.pcosnutrition.com/vitaminb12/ PCOS Nutrition Center Articles/Blog www.pcosnutrition.com Strong evidence is showing metformin depletes levels of vitamin B12. Here's what to do. Having been on various androgen deprivation medications and associated therapies relatively successfully over the past 21 plus years, my current prostate cancer therapy, having had a great response with Zytiga/abiraterone acetate that eventually failed after 5 years 8 months, is Xtandi/enzalutamide 4/40mg capsules (160mg) once daily, Metformin ER one 500mg tablet twice daily, continuing Lupron/leuprolide acetate 45mg injection every 6 months, continuing Avodart/dutasteride one 0.5mg capsule daily, continuing Cabergoline/Dostinex 0.25mg one tablet Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and denosumab as Prolia 60mg subcutaneous injection every 6 months. An added consideration for those prescribed Avodart/dutasteride and have been taking this medication for 4 to 6 months is recognizing it will have established itself in your system. In so doing, you can then change to taking the 0.5mg capsule every other, or even every third day and it will remain just as effective as daily because of its long half-life. This can be a consideration in cost saving if you don’t have health insurance coverage for oral medications. The half-life of Avodart is 5 weeks, and it can take 4 to 6 months for the medication to be totally eliminated from the system once it is stopped. See: http://www.drugs.com/pro/avodart.html and scroll down to “Pharmacokinetics” Avodart - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses www.drugs.com Avodart official prescribing information for healthcare professionals. Includes: indications, dosage, adverse reactions, pharmacology and more. DISCLAIMER: Please recognize that I am not a Medical Doctor. Rather, I do consider myself a medical detective. I have been an avid student researching and studying prostate cancer as a survivor and continuing patient since 1992. I have dedicated my retirement years to continued deep research and study in order to serve as an advocate for prostate cancer awareness, and, from an activist patient’s viewpoint, as a mentor to voluntarily help patients, caregivers, and others interested develop an understanding of this insidious men’s disease, its treatment options, and the treatment of the side effects that often accompany treatment. There is absolutely no charge for my mentoring – I provide this free service as one who has been there and hoping to make their journey one with better understanding and knowledge than was available to me when I was diagnosed so many years ago. IMPORTANTLY, readers of medical information I may provide are provided this “disclaimer” to make certain they understand that the comments or recommendations I make are not intended to be the procedure to blindly follow; rather, they are to be reviewed as MY OPINION, then used for further personal research, study, and subsequent discussion with the medical professional/physician providing their prostate cancer care. Charles (Chuck) Maack - Prostate Cancer Patient/Activist/Mentor (A mentor should be someone who offers courtesy, professionalism, respect, wisdom, knowledge, and support to help you achieve your goals; would that I succeed) Always as close as the other end of your computer to help address any prostate cancer concerns. "What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others." “A good character is the best tombstone. Those who loved you will remember. Carve your name on hearts, not on marble.” “Sepius Exertus, Semper Paratus, Semper Fortis, Semper Fidelis, Fraters Infinitas” “Often tested, Always Prepared, Always Courageous, Always Faithful, Brothers Forever" Recipient 2008 Us TOO Intl., Inc., Prostate Education & Support Network 1st “Edward C. Kaps Hope Award” Recipient 2012 Prostate Cancer Research Institute (PCRI) “Harry Pinchot Award” Recipient 2016 Us TOO Intl., Inc. Certificate for 20 Years Dedication/Inspiration Published papers: “A Wake Up Call To Men & The Women Who Care For Them” JCPCR-06-00189 Volume 6 issue 1 - 2016: http://tinyurl.com/3djfgve “A Prostate Cancer Patient’s 24-Year (1992-2016) Continuing Journey from Diagnosis to Treatment to Recurrence to Mentoring” JCPCR-04—201604 Volume 4 issue 4 – 2016: http://tinyurl.com/hcxuxv9 “Newly Diagnosed with Prostate Cancer? - A Mentor/Patient Discussion” May 23, 2017 Biomedical Journal of Scientific & Technical Research (BJSTR) http://biomedres.us/pdfs/BJSTR.MS.ID.000110.pdf “Prostate Cancer Advocacy and Mentoring Support” – published November 22, 2017 in the journal “Holistic Approaches in Oncotherapy” HAOT-17-OPN-0004 1.1 (2017): 14-15; https://scientiaricerca.com/srhaot/pdf/SRHAOT-01-00003.pdf
  13. Hi Raymond You wiil recieve a meeting notice on Wednesday night 31 January for the Friday 2 February 2018 telephone meeting. The meeting commences at 9.30am Eastern Standard Time. The telephone number and meeting joining details will be included in the notice. Look forward to you joining us. Nev Black
  14. Hi, I am new to this site. It says that the dates/times above are for phone ins....what phone number do you call to be involved?
  15. Prostate Cancer and Glaucoma

    Wow your perseverance has certainly paid off two fold. Let it be a lesson to us all don't accept the narrative that we are given without testing it. Hope you continue to be on top.
  16. Prostate Cancer and Glaucoma

    A timely reminder that we should seek another opinion if we are not satisfied with the outcome of our treatment. And yes, may 2018 be not just a good year but also a great one! John 44
  17. Prostate Cancer and Glaucoma

    Helo Guihan, Quite an interesting episode! I don't understand how to relate the drug actions to the amazing results you have got. No doubt you can take them all as a New Year Bonanza! I admire your perseverance and your own experimentation that defeated the indifferent attitudes of many a so called specialist doctor. I too underwent a Radical Prostatectomy in March 2015 followed by IMRT and ADT. My surgeon was an expert who saved me from any possible incontinence from day one! And continent up to now. Back in 2003, may be the standard of similar surgeries might have been different. I also congratulate you on reaching almost 15 years since your diagnosis and wish you many more years of Good Health! Happy New year to you and family! Sisira
  18. Prostate Cancer and Glaucoma

    When I had a radical prostatectomy, nobody was too surprised that this left me with urinary incontinence requiring the daily use of medium-grade incontinence pads. Prior to that (in 1999) I had been diagnosed with glaucoma. To try to save my sight, I had to use daily eye-drops to reduce my eye pressures. Various drugs were tried over the years, but eye specialist seem to have their favourites. By the time of my radical prostatectomy in 2003, I was using Xalatan and Cosopt eye-drops. Eleven years later, it was discovered that the Xalatan was the cause of my daily migraines. When the Xalatan was dropped, the migraines disappeared, and I continued with the Cosopt and various other drugs, including Alphagan. In recent times, my eyesight has degraded. I am already blind in one eye, and the optic nerves in the remaining eye are described as “end-stage”. I decided my remaining bit of vision was worth fighting for. To that end, I purchased my own tonometer (for measuring eye pressures) and ran a series of tests to establish which type of eye-drops worked best for me. My test results shocked me. It turned out that, although Alphagan worked quite well, Cosopt seemed to be serving no useful purpose. I then dropped the Cosopt, and increased my use of Alphagan to three times a day (in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations). After about a week, not only were my eye pressures lower, but I discovered that I was no longer incontinent – after 14 years! Now, many weeks later, I am still free of those pads, and I can state that my incontinence has gone. Now, who would have imagined that glaucoma eye-drops could have such an effect on a sensitive bladder!
  19. A Lutetium trial will be open to enrolment in late 2017

    Is this the trial that compares Lutetium-177 treatment to Cabazitaxel treatment?
  20. Cabazitaxel

    Hi Brenda, If your dad can afford lutetium 177 privately it is available even if he has had cabazitaxel. The cost I believe is upwards of $10.000 per treatment and 6 treatments may be required. I intend to try a couple when the time comes. Kind regards, Ian
  21. lutetium 177 treatment any experience

    Hi Claude As a thought - what about you ask your husbands Oncologist to give you a referral to the principle investigator in this trial :- A/Professor Michael Hofman at the VCCC in Melbourne. If the major tumors are not PSMA active - it is improbable that Lutetium177 treatment will work for your husband but A/Professor Michael Hofman is one of the top experts on this treatment in Australia - he is the person who set up the Lutetium trial in the first place. If he feels there is insufficient expression of PSMA he might be able to guide you as to what other treatments you can consider. I've had Lutetium treatment and always happy to take a phone call to discuss.
  22. lutetium 177 treatment any experience

    hi, my husband is considering the treatment. His oncologist has sent the referral to Sydney. Would you tell me if they conducted the interwiew by skype( we are in melbourne) in a professional manner? I'm having some concerns as not all of the mets are PSMA avid from what we understand on the PSMA pet scan the major tumors are not PSMA active. Thank you for your help
  23. Sisira Anyone may post links anywhere to any of our posts. On the other hand, if merely copying content, be careful to also copy any permissions we have included. The permission for this article is: With thanks to Cancer Institute NSW under Creative Commons Attribution 4.
  24. Phone-in meeting dates 2018 Fourth Friday of each month, except: January (one week late for Australia Day, making 2 meetings in February), and December (one week early for Christmas) February 2 (one week late for Australia Day) February 23 March 23 (not the last Friday) April 27 May 25 June 22 (not the last Friday) July 27 August 24 (not the last Friday) September 28 October 26 November 23 (not the last Friday) December 14 (one week early for Christmas) Time 9:30am - 11:00am Eastern Standard Time (Queensland) The formal phone-in meeting ends after 90 minutes. The lines are kept open for an hour after that for members to informally chat. Daylight savings times Brisbane 9:30am Sydney, Melbourne, Hobart: 10:30am Adelaide, 10:00am Perth 7:30am Winter times Brisbane 9:30am Sydney, Melbourne, Hobart 9:30am Adelaide 9:00am Perth 7:30am Daylight saving ends first Sunday in April Daylight saving starts first Sunday in October Face-to-a-name meetings, South East Queensland and Northern NSW 11:00am for lunch at noon Saturday 3 March 2018 Saturday 21 July 2018 Saturday 3 November 2018 Face-to-a-name meetings, Victoria 12 noon for lunch at 12.30pm Saturday 24 February 2018 Saturday 28 July 2018 Saturday 24 November 2018 Face-to-a-name meetings, NSW 12 noon for lunch at 12.30pm TBA Committee meetings 4:00pm (Brisbane) first Wednesday of each month Wednesday 3 January 2018 5:00pm (Sydney) Wednesday 7 February 2018 5:00pm (Sydney) Wednesday 7 March 2018 5:00pm (Sydney) Wednesday 4 April 2018 4:00pm (Sydney) Wednesday 2 May 2018 4:00pm (Sydney) Wednesday 6 June 2018 4:00pm (Sydney) Wednesday 4 July 2018 4:00pm (Sydney) Wednesday 1 August 2018 4:00pm (Sydney) Wednesday 5 September 2018 4:00pm (Sydney) Wednesday 3 October 2018 4:00pm (Sydney) Wednesday 7 November 2018 5:00pm (Sydney) Wednesday 5 December 2018 5:00pm (Sydney)
  25. Site Admin, May I have your kind permission to copy this and post it to HealthUnlocked site of of Malecare with a proper acknowledgement and due appreciation of your original posting? Thanks Sisira
  26. Thanks a lot for this informative and very useful post. Sisira
  27. Safety at home for patients on chemotherapy

    Interesting! I had not read this listing in the past. The abbreviated words may leave confusion in some readers. And though the several recommendations appear much to worry about, they really are not and once in practice will be easy to be ready and perform. Good advice just knowing what to be aware. Thanks, Admin, for sharing. Advice to chemo patients and their caregivers: print this out and save to refer to if needed. For those patients expecting a move to chemo: this gives you a head-start to accumulate what items are good to have at hand and time to "be prepared."
  28. Safety at home for patients on chemotherapy Chemotherapy (pronounced kee-mo-ther- a-pee) is a cancer treatment that uses drugs or medicines to kill cancer cells. It is sometimes just called ‘chemo’. Patients can have chemotherapy in different ways. Intravenous (IV) chemotherapy is given into the patient’s vein, and goes straight into their blood. Oral chemotherapy is given by mouth, as tablets, capsules or liquids that the patient swallows. Bush medicine Bush medicine could cause problems for patients having cancer treatment. Your patient should check with their doctor before using bush medicine. There are important safety measures that you should take while caring for patients who are having chemotherapy. You also need to educate your patients, and their families and carers, about safety. This section explains: how to protect yourself, and your patients’ families and carers, from chemotherapy drugs how to support patients who are taking oral chemotherapy at home what equipment you may need, like gloves and spill kits. 6 Chemotherapy safety Safety information for all chemotherapy patients Chemotherapy drugs kill cancer cells but can also damage normal cells. Each time your patient has chemotherapy, it can take up to seven days for the chemotherapy drugs to leave the body. During these seven days, chemotherapy drugs can be in the patient’s body fluids or waste products, including: blood urine (wee) vomit (spew) saliva (spit) semen vaginal secretions sweat stool/faeces (poo). If you accidentally touch any of these fluids, some of the chemotherapy drug could get into your body through your skin. You, and your patient’s family and carers, need to take special care to stay safe for the first seven days after each chemotherapy treatment. The information on the next pages explains how to do this. Important Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should not touch: chemotherapy medication body fluids (wee, vomit, etc.) of someone having chemotherapy any bedding, clothing, or cleaning cloths with the above body fluids on them. Safety at home for patients on chemotherapy 7 Educate your patient About cleaning up spills If there is a spill of any body fluids (e.g. poo, wee, spew), put on rubber gloves and use a disposable cloth to clean up the spill straight away. Place the cloth in a plastic bag and tie it closed; then place that plastic bag into another plastic bag and tie it closed— this is called ‘double-bagging’. The plastic bag can then be placed in the normal household rubbish. Towels, linen or clothing that have body fluids on them should be machine washed separately in a hot or cold wash, on the longest washing cycle. They can then be dried outside. If there is a spill of body fluids on a bench top or floor, wear rubber gloves and wash it off with lots of water and detergent. About feeling sick and vomiting • It is a good idea to keep a plastic bowl or bag (without holes in it) handy for this. • A bowl used for vomiting, should not be used for anything else. • Wash the bowl out after each use. • Throw it away at the end of the chemotherapy treatment. About going to the toilet After going to the toilet, close the lid, and flush the toilet on full flush. This is so that fluids from the toilet don’t splash out. Men should sit down when using the toilet so there is no splashing. About having sex Your patient and their partner should always wear condoms when having sex in the first seven days after chemotherapy treatment. This is because low amounts of chemotherapy drugs may be passed in the semen or vaginal secretions. 8 Chemotherapy safety Safety information for patients taking oral chemotherapy at home You may need to care for patients taking oral chemotherapy at home. The patient may have to take tablets, capsules or liquid medicine. The information below explains how to do this safely. Make sure your patient knows how to take their oral chemotherapy drugs Most patients will have a written plan, telling them when to take their tablets. It’s a good idea for you to go through this with them to make sure they have understood this information. Make sure the patient knows they must take the oral chemotherapy exactly as their doctor or pharmacist has told them to. This includes taking it on the right day, at the right time, and with or without food, as directed. Check that your patient knows how to store their oral chemotherapy drugs safely It is important that your patient: • keeps the chemotherapy drugs in their original packaging • stores any chemotherapy drugs (tablets or liquids) as the doctor or pharmacist tells them to • stores them safely away from children or animals. Safety at home for patients on chemotherapy 9 Educate your patient How to handle oral chemotherapy drugs safely Your patient: Your patient can handle the oral chemotherapy drugs because the treatment is for them. After taking the drugs, they should wash their hands before touching anything else. You, and the patient’s family or carers You, and the patient’s family or carers, should never touch chemotherapy medicine with your bare hands. This is because some of the chemotherapy drug could be absorbed into your body through your skin. Sometimes you, or someone else, will need to touch chemotherapy drugs to help the patient to take them. You should always wear a pair of rubber gloves to touch or handle chemotherapy drugs. Wash your hands after taking off the gloves. How to take oral chemotherapy drugs safely Your patient should: • take the chemotherapy exactly as directed by their doctor or pharmacist (e.g. this may be with food or on an empty stomach)—it will say on the medicine label on the bottle • swallow the chemotherapy tablets or capsules whole—never crush, cut, chew or bite tablets, and do not open capsules • wash their hands after handling the chemotherapy tablet or capsule. Note: If the patient cannot swallow the tablets, talk to the doctor straight away. 10 Chemotherapy safety Important things to know What if my patient vomits after taking the chemotherapy? If your patient vomits straight after taking a dose of oral chemotherapy, they should not take a replacement dose but contact the treatment team for further advice. If they have been given anti-sickness tablets to stop nausea and vomiting, they should take this medicine as the doctor or pharmacist has instructed, even if they do not feel sick. If they have taken the anti-sickness medication and it does not stop them from vomiting, speak with the doctor about what to do. Make a note to tell the doctor or nurse from the treatment team about any missed or vomited doses. Important What if my patient forgets to take their chemotherapy tablets? • If your patient forgets to take a chemotherapy dose, they should take the next dose at the normal time, as prescribed. • Refer to the eviQ patient information sheet that they may have been given for further information. If the patient is unsure about what to do, speak with the doctor or clinic staff on the next working day. What if my patient has finished chemotherapy treatment but has some tablets left? Leftover chemotherapy capsules or tablets should be returned to the cancer clinic or pharmacy. If your patient is having chemotherapy treatment in hospital, they may see nursing staff wearing protective equipment. This is necessary for some types of chemotherapy administration. It is nothing to be frightened of. Safety at home for patients on chemotherapy 11 Useful equipment Gloves The best gloves to use are nitrile gloves, which are made from synthetic rubber and are resistant to chemotherapy. If you or your patient don’t have nitrile gloves, you can use: two pairs of disposable gloves, or a thick pair of rubber gloves that can be bought from the supermarket. Whichever gloves you use, they should only be used for cleaning up spills (see page 8), or for handling chemotherapy medication (see page 10). Home-made spill kit If your patient does not have a spill kit provided by the hospital, it is a good idea for them to keep a kit at home to clean up spills. It should include: incontinence pad/’inco sheet’ or disposable cloths gloves plastic apron vomit bag/bowl plastic bags. Important Be careful when removing gloves. Do not touch the outside of the gloves with your bare hands. Wash your hands after removing gloves. If using re-useable gloves, these gloves should be stored separately in a sealed plastic bag and thrown away at the end of treatment. With thanks to Cancer Institute NSW under Creative Commons Attribution 4. See also: Dealing with the risk of infection while on chemotherapy with Taxotere (docetaxel):
  29. Cabazitaxel

    Hi Brenda, As is the case with all trials, before one can get on a trial - you need to meet the eligibility criteria. The following is in part of the question and answers sheet provided to patients thinking about the Lutetium177 trial. What stage of prostate cancer patients are you looking for? This trial is suitable for men in whom the prostate cancer has spread to other parts of the body, has grown despite previous hormone treatment and docetaxel chemotherapy, and where the next step would normally be to consider further chemotherapy with cabazitaxel. I have had previous docetaxel (also referred to as Taxotere) chemotherapy, am I still eligible for this study? Yes, you must have received treatment with docetaxel chemotherapy to be eligible for this study. I have previously had Cabazitaxel chemotherapy, am I still eligible for this study? No, if you have previously been treated with cabazitaxel you are not eligible for this trial. Something to ask about when discussing your Dads on going treatment with his oncologist. Your Dad will only be eligible for the Lutetium177 - if he has not had Cabazitaxel. Cheers, Barree
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